Don’t Sweat the Small Stuff: Eency, Teensy Oaxaca Dragon

Tiny Dragon with a Big Heart

Well, maybe not SO eency.  She is only 4-1/2″ tall, this hand-carved and painted Dragon Miss (too frivolous to be a Dragon Lady).  She actually looks more like a teenager dressed for the junior prom (do they still do that?) or a second date, all prettied up in her floral print, dressed to impress wouldn’t you say?  I am not beyond using anthropomorphism to give her human attributions!

When I look at her I just have to smile at the whimsy by which she was created at the hand of talented young Arrazola alebrije painter Bertha Cruz.  (The carving is done by Bertha’s husband.)  Bertha has breathed life into this little gal.  Who would ever think of marrying yellow marigold flowers, polka dots, a flame-red tongue and zebra-stripes on a dragon?  Only a Zapotec with a creative and fanciful mind.  She says to me, “Don’t sweat the small stuff.”

Eeency, teency, teenage dancing dragon

I was working on her today when WordPress sends me a tickler: write about something SMALL.  It was perfect timing.

Recently, my little dragon’s ears, fore-wings and one of her back wings dislodged and I needed to do some repair work.  Using a teeny weeny container of Loctite Super Glue (Control Gel) that measures 3-3/4″ tall (but VERY powerful — it will glue your skin together if you aren’t careful), I put drops of the clear stuff into the eency holes that serve as orifices for the small pointed ends of the wood carved and painted pieces.  Then, I pressed the pointy ends into the holes and counted to twenty.  Instantly terminado (finished).  She is as good as new.

I love this piece.  It reminds me of the joy and creativity of Oaxacaquenos and the colors of the city that I love so much.

4 Responses to Don’t Sweat the Small Stuff: Eency, Teensy Oaxaca Dragon

  1. Beautiful dragon!! Love Bertha Cruz’s painting. And I loveeeee Oaxaca!! I hope you will briefly check out my blog, which is all about alebrijes! :) Have a great weekend, Whitney

  2. Thanks again for transporting me to the land of fanciful dreams! I know that the tradition is to buy an alebrije only to give as a gift, but I’ve one rana that I just can’t find the right person for it — can one gift oneself and not break the tradition?

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