Voladores Fly in Cuetzalan del Progreso, Puebla, Mexico. So Do Bees!

Everything leading up to October 3 in Cuetzalan del Progreso is a preview for what’s to come. This is the day each year that the Voladores fly: Danza de Voladores.

When the Voladores fly, everyone pays attention.

When the Voladores fly, everyone pays attention. They are 120 feet high.

There is a huge carnival in the church courtyard and troupes of costumed, masked revelers come in from the villages to dance, sing and raise some hoopla.

Masked revelers dance in church courtyard and before the altar inside

Masked revelers dance in church courtyard and before the altar inside

Handmade beeswax candles adorn the church altar in huge displays of tiered confection, just like wedding cakes. The colors dazzle.

Handmade candles adorn the church, stacked like confeccions

Handmade candles adorn the church, stacked like a tiered wedding cake

On October 4, the queen of the festival is crowned. Cuetzalan is packed with people, a few extranjeros (foreigners), visitors from other parts of Mexico, and lots of locals who come in from mountain villages by colectivos (shared taxis) and camionetas (truck transport).

Wedding cake hand-crafted beeswax candles, Cuetzalan church

Wedding cake hand-crafted beeswax candles, Cuetzalan church

The town square becomes a puesto (open market stalls) with alleys of textiles, beaded necklaces made from local coffee beans and seed pods, roasted corn on a stick layered with mayonnaise and chili, carved wood masks, sizzling comals (griddles).

Voladores circle the pole 52 times, in keeping with the Aztec calendar

Voladores circle the pole 52 times, in keeping with the Aztec calendar, before climbing

Hawkers, mostly the ancient ones, sell armadillo shell purses (yes, I bought one), gourd water jugs (I bought one, too), woven fiber bags (passed), wild mint (poleo) candies guaranteed to cure stomach ache (yes, though I didn’t have a stomach ache).

Four topple in unison, one stays aloft playing a flute

Four topple in unison, one stays aloft playing a pre-Hispanic flute

You can sidle up to a portable comedor (kitchen) to eat tacos, tamales, chicken with mole, squash blossom quesadillas. Thirsty? How about fresh fruit waters made with watermelon, cantaloupe, papaya, oranges.

Young men learn to become Voladores very early, practicing, practicing

Young men learn to become Voladores very early, practicing, practicing

It’s hard to keep your money in your pocket!

Candles that will become part of the church altar to celebrate on October 3

Candles that will become part of the church altar to celebrate on October 3

The day before, Merry Foss took us to the famous candlemaker Eugenio Mendez Nava, whose family makes beeswax candles for church celebrations. He is a national treasure and won the Grand Prize in the 2016 National Folk Art Competition.

Grand master of beeswax candles prepares for church celebration.

Grand master of beeswax candles, Eugenio Mendez Nava, prepares for celebration.

We hopped on a colectivo to get to his workshop outside of town. We saw the preparations for the October 3 church celebrations in the making, were awed by the size of the candles, the intricacy of the molds, the bees swarming around the opening to the clay pot hives that were tucked into the workshop corner.

Makings of the church tiered wedding cake candle extravaganza

Makings of the church tiered wedding cake candle extravaganza

Fresh, wild honey is sold all over Cuetzalan. Here’s what the hives look like. Different from the white boxes we see all over the U.S.  I imagine that Puebla people use the resources that are easiest to make and keep for beehives.

Clay beehives at the candlemaking workshop of Eugenia Mendez Nava

Clay beehives at the candlemaking workshop of Eugenia Mendez Nava

Birdcage in the workshop of candlemaker Eugenio Mendez Nava

Birdcage in the workshop of candlemaker Eugenio Mendez Nava

There are multiple groups of Voladores flyers. Some of them are women, and why not. Courage and fortitude know no gender (as we move into the final days of the election in the United States of America).

Inside the church, at the altar, a frenzy of dance movement, drum beating

Inside the church, at the altar, a frenzy of dance movement, drum beating

They start flying at around 4 p.m. on October 3 and continue until after dark. At twilight, groups of dancers and costumed revelers come into the plaza, tooting horns, flutes, singing, beating drums.  They go in and out of the church, dancing at the altar, seeking blessings.

Whirlwind of color. No one stood still!

A whirlwind of color. No one stood still. I’m thinking blurry could be okay!

In the naves, young men stopped to take a breath, take a drink, fix broken decorations, tie shoe laces, and give each other the Mexican handshake — first brushing open palms together, then giving each other a bump with the closed fist.

Repairing the feather headdress before joining into the next blessing dance

Repairing the feather headdress before joining into the next blessing dance.

Meanwhile, outside, the next set of Voladores assembled ready to climb the pole. Humans in flight, spinning, ribbons fly in the wind, arms wide, feet wrapped around the rope, upside down, a several minute suspension.

Climbing a wood and rope ladder high into the sky

Climbing a wood and rope ladder high into the sky

There were not many foreign visitors here. Is it because people are afraid to come to Mexico. We took a 6-hour bus ride from Mexico City to get to Cuetzalan. A perfectly safe adventure. And, then a 4-hour bus ride from Cuetzalan to Puebla. Also, very safe. See what you are missing?

The next group of Voladores waiting their turn.

The next group of Voladores waiting their turn.

The flying men gather in prayer before climbing the pole.

The flying men gather in prayer before climbing the pole.

Caps with ribbon tassels, decorated with flowers, worn by Voladores

Soft landing, upside down, but he'll turn over soon enough!

Soft landing, upside down, but he’ll turn over soon enough!

The eagle has landed!

The eagle has landed!

As night descended, Barbara and I left the church. There was a light drizzle that turned to a gentle rain. The scene was obscure, dramatic, filled with shadows of retreating people. This region is tropical, damp and lush. We don’t go anywhere without an umbrella!

Our evening ends amid the rain drops and shadows of retreating dancers

Our evening ends amid the rain drops and shadows of retreating dancers

One more shadowy night on the zocalo, Cuetzalan

How to Get There: From Mexico TAPO bus station, take the ADO bus to Cuetzalan del Progreso, Pueblo. Cost is about $20 USD. Trip length: 6 hours.

Where to Stay: Casa la Piedra, Cuetzalan del Progreso.

How to Return: From Cuetzalan buy a bus ticket at the new bus station in town on the Via line to Puebla CAPU. Cost is about $16 USD. Trip length: 4 hours.

How to Get From Puebla to Mexico City: Buy a bus ticket on Estrella Roja leaving Puebla every 30 minutes to the Mexico City airport, direct. Cost: About $16 USD. Trip length: 2.5 hours.

Where to Stay in Puebla: Hotel Casareyna is one of our favorites! They have a new addition and can accommodate many more guests. Sublime luxury. Try Bookingdotcom for bargain prices available.

8 Responses to Voladores Fly in Cuetzalan del Progreso, Puebla, Mexico. So Do Bees!

  1. Many thanks Norma and safe journeys Your travels fascinate me… thank you for sharing

  2. You can also see the Voladores fly on weekends outside of the Museum of Anthropology and History in Mexico City, on the explanade. It is dramatic, colorful and not intended ‘just for tourists’, the “voladores” (flyers) are very serious about their flying act. They installed the very high wooden pool before dawn some time ago, when there were no curious eyes to watch, and carried out an important ritual with their prayers and songs to purify the site. Every so often, they have to change the weather-beaten pole for a new one to insure safety – and the same ritual is carried out in the early morning hours.
    Norma: your description of the Cuetzalan festival is superb! As usual. I wish I could have been there. Big abrazo, my wonderful globetrotting friend!

    • Not many know Mexico better than you, Elena Hannan! Born and raised in Mexico by two gringos. What could be better? Hey, y’all, Elena’s father was a mining engineer in Northern Mexico. Thanks for this great tip and recommendation to readers. Besos.

  3. Thank you for taking me with you on this wonderful journey. Your vibrant narrative and colorful photos helped me feel as if I was there !

    Thanks so much,
    Elaina

  4. Hello Norma

    Would have loved to see the Voladores… Do you have any idea where else one could see them outside of the State of Veracruz?? if you do, would really love to know… this is a bucket list item for us… Thank you

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