Mexico City Architecture: Luis Barragan House Photo Essay

True Confession: In all the years I’ve been visiting Mexico City, I never made it to the Casa Luis Barragan in Colonia Condesa. One of the benefits of staying in this neighborhood is to make a pilgrimage to the home where this disciple of Corbusier lived. You MUST make a reservation in advance to visit. Only small groups go through the house and studio with a guide.

Textured and adjoining smooth walls add drama

Luis Barragan, winner of the Pritzker Prize, is one of Mexico’s most famed architects who influenced an entire generation of architects, including Ricardo Legorretta, has volumes written about him. His work is documented with great photography. I hope you read more.

What fascinates me is how he uses space — sometimes spare, sometimes cluttered, always calculated. His brilliant and punctuated use of color is incorporated into serene, cloistered rooms. I am surprised to move from small, intimate spaces into large living areas with high ceilings, walls, partitions, bringing the outdoors into the interior. There are design lessons to be learned here for how to live with a few, very meaningful objects.

Center piece. Lots of tables and niches and nooks to settle into throughout the house.

Twenty foot ceilings make small rooms larger.

Photo of Barragan, exceptionally tall, posing on floating staircase

The Miguelito Chair, designed by Barragan

Floating staircase leads to small study on second floor from library

Intimate, small library, cozy, comfortable

Painting by friend Mathias Goeritz is like a mirror

Color, louvered doors accentuates space transition

Rooftop terrace at Casa Luis Barragan

Stunning hot pink wall is backdrop to blooming vines

Mexican flowering vine Copa de Oro

Tonala, Guadalajara hand-blown glass globes reflect in every room

Luscious color in entry way, detail

One small lamp illuminates Barragan’s private dining room

Barragan, a very private man, loved his solitude. His small, dark, private dining room is like a cloister. Extremely tall, very religious, he designed spaces with small door frames and low ceilings, requiring him to bend as if in prayer, as he moved through his home and studio.

Reflection from inside to out, bringing the spaces together.

Collection of old ceramic mezcal jars are focal point of small patio

Patios have small water features, either fountains or large lava rock or ceramic bowls to collect water, that reflects nature.

Hot pink door opens to verdant green space.

My sister Barbara in the living room through the glass.

Warm colors of studio — he painted skylights and windows yellow

Outside a neighbor’s house, a whimsical sculpture

I love these globes. You can buy them in patio shops throughout the USA.

Sister Barbara in silhouette. Large windows bring green to interior.

Studio space is used as a gallery for featured shows now.

Where we are staying: In a penthouse apartment owned by Nai, with a terrace overlooking the treetops and rooftops of this walkable neighborhood. I highly recommend this location. See it on Air BnB.

We are getting around using UBER. Most rides are under $4 USD. Safe, on-time, dependable, secure.

10 Responses to Mexico City Architecture: Luis Barragan House Photo Essay

  1. Don’t know when I’ll next be in Mex City next but this place is on my list. Love your photos and your descriptions.
    I am loving those silver globes, and would like to purchase one. Do you know where I can get it? Would have to be online as I’m in Australia,

  2. Thank you so much for posting this. I hadn’t heard of Casa Luis Barragan and will high on my “to visit” list the next time I go to Mexico City!

  3. Thanks Norma. So enjoyed your narrative of Barragan’s home and your wonderful photos. We’ve been to Mexico City but somehow missed this, which is a shame since architecture is an interest of ours. Saying that, your blog was enjoyable. Nice that you have your sister there visiting.

  4. Hi Norma
    My daughter and I went there in Dec.
    Loved it and appreciate your photos. What a treasure! Gracia

  5. Oh, I cannot wait to experience this, Norma! Thank you for sharing .

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