In The Cloud Forest at San Antonio Cuajimoloyas, Ixtlan, Oaxaca, Mexico

Oliver Sacks, medical doctor and writer, talks about Oaxaca biodiversity and you can read about it in his Oaxaca Journal.  He talks about coming to Oaxaca for forty years. You can also easily experience the climate range by visiting the Ethnobotanical Garden behind Templo Santo Domingo, where there is a sampling of the microclimates found throughout the state.

The cloud forest at San Antonio Cuajimaloyos, misty mountains

But, nothing quite matches the real thing — a visit to the cloud forest high above the Oaxaca valley floor in the Pueblos Mancomunados where eco-tourism is front and center. A packed dirt road (that could be called a trail) goes between the villages along the spine of the Sierra Madre del Sur mountain range.

I imagine the Cotswolds might look something like this

Here you will find  rustic cabins, simple and delicious comedors with local food prepared in homestyle kitchens by knowledgeable cooks, and a range of outdoor activities to delight hikers, bikers, runners, climbers, horse riders, and zip line enthusiasts. Some people like to go village-to-village to fully experience the mountains.

Flower gardens and succulents thrive in this climate

Perhaps not much could be better than being up here in a hot summer, when ten to fifteen degree cooler temperatures prevail. But, this has been no usual summer and cool weather in the valley means it is much cooler higher up. But, summer has just begun here and who knows? I may head for the hills again.

A beautiful hill town with vibrant color everywhere

San Antonio Cuajimoloyas hosted a race last Sunday and I decided to go along with Eric and Elsa, since he decided to compete with his Oaxaca running team. That meant leaving Teotitlan del Valle at 6:30 a.m. for the about forty-minute (plus) ride up the mountain on a very curvy road via the Tlacolula intersection.

Under cloud cover everyone is bundled up

We passed Diaz Ordaz and the vegetation started to change: dense pine forest, huge cactus the size of a cow, leafy ferns with arms outstretched ten feet, steep hills, flowing stream beds, an occasional bull plowing a vertical field.

It’s an un-selfie. Too cold to be fashionable.

Atmospheric, colorful houses, tin and lots of weathering

As we ascended, Eric turned on the windshield wipers as we entered the cloud cover. It wasn’t really rain per se. It was more like a soft blanket of drizzle, comforting, though the road was obscured and we couldn’t see more than twenty feet ahead.

Elsa in front of a giant, non-mezcal producing agave. Brrr.

Road signs welcomed us to San Antonio Cuajimoloyas. The scene was like a diffused Rembrandt landscape painting, the subjects in the foreground sharp and those in the background fading out to a blurred gray in the fog.

Runners wait for the horn to signal the race start

Packed dirt path makes for great hiking, biking, running

We climbed the 45-degree angle cobbled streets to the trailhead where the race would begin. There were two groups: the half-marathoners and those running a 10K.  At this altitude, 10,490 feet, I needed to stop for breaths even though I’m a seasoned walker at 6K feet altitude. My Fitbit claims I climbed 23 flights of stairs that day.

Taking a long stretch to get those muscles ready

Those assembled looked much like USA runners and those all over the world. They had on the gear:  hydration packs, polypropylene shirts and shells, familiar shoe brands, caps and scarves for warmth. We live in a small universe with much in common. Perhaps some day, the current government in the USA will recognize that.

A running team posing for the camera

Racers gather at the starting line and sprint as the horn sounds

Gosh it was cold up there! Refreshingly perfect for exercise and to be in nature.

Taking a hot chocolate break away from the cold

While Eric ran (10K in 58 minutes, a great time for him), Elsa and I hung out on the main street in a cafe, sipping Oaxaca hot chocolate and dunking sweet bread into the rich liquid.

After the race, let’s have some water! He’s happy with his time.

By The Way: We haven’t had much rain here since I returned in late June, so I’m hoping the clouds will give enough moisture for the annual Wild Mushroom Festival held in August in Cuajimoloyas. (Who says there’s no Global Warming?)

Another finisher who ran the 1/2 marathon

Onlookers or are they getting their morning exercise, too

On the way down the mountain, a San Miguel del Valle border sign

A view of Tlacolula and Teotitlan del Valle from up high

Where Teotitlan lands end, at the border of Cuajimoloyas, in Spanish and Zapotec

Our stop on the way home included barbecue goat tacos for breakfast at the Tlacolula Sunday market, and home by 1 p.m.

Barbecue goat taco, Tlacolula Market

Eco-Tourism in San Antonio Cuajimoloyas: One to Three-Day Tour Operators

If I am missing anyone, please let me know and I will add them to the list.

P.S. This is not an endorsement. Please do your research and if you decide to go, choose a tour operator best suited to your own needs.

 

 

 

8 responses to “In The Cloud Forest at San Antonio Cuajimoloyas, Ixtlan, Oaxaca, Mexico

  1. Hi Norma, we will be there in mid Aug for a month and hope to meet you. I wrote a blog on Oliver Sachs you might like. David

    https://thinkinthemorning.com/oliver-sacks-in-oaxaca/

  2. So how cold is it up there? 55 degrees? When I lived in Tucson people would wear parkas when it got close to 60 ! Fun to see the cloud forest so close to you!
    Kaola and I are having our first night in Santa Fe. Chilly here too after a rain but 95 expected tomorrow
    Besos!

    • It was 10 degrees Celsius. I’d have to conver that. It doesn’t come naturally! Ok. 50 degrees Fahrenheit. Cold for us. Like winter nights in the Oaxaca Valley. All layers legitimate. Cheers to you and Kaola.

  3. How admirable for those runners to run long races at that altitude!

  4. Norma, I am enjoying your blogs so much! Thank you .

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