Category Archives: Carved Figures

Que Supresa! Oaxaca in San Diego, California

As I drive south from my son’s home in Huntington Beach, California, on my way to visit Barbara and David, and dear friend Merry Foss in San Diego, I marvel at how the landscape looks like Mexico, how the climate feels like Mexico. Except there is development everywhere, new houses, shopping centers, freeway congestion. Infrastructure.

Pedro Mendoza and Carina Santiago from Teotitlan del Valle, in San Diego, CA

Pedro Mendoza and Carina Santiago from Teotitlan del Valle, in San Diego, CA

When I stop at the Pacific Ocean overlook, everyone around me speaks Spanish and I take up a conversation with a young mother traveling with two daughters from El Paso, Tejas (the J is a soft H. Tay-Hass). Oh, you might think that could be Texas. Sometimes I think we are borrowing the Southwest from Mexico and the day of reckoning will come when most of us will speak Spanish and justice will prevail.

Sisters Consuelo (left) and Violante Ulrich continue the Spratling silver tradition

Sisters Consuelo (left) and Violante Ulrich continue the Spratling silver tradition

At Barbara and David’s house, I expect a small gathering. I know my Teotitlan del Valle friend Merry Foss will be there with exquisite beaded blouses from the State of Puebla Sierra Norte made by a cooperative of indigenous women that Merry started six years ago.

Jacobo Angeles with copal wood carved and painted ram from San Martin Tilcajete, Oaxaca

Jacobo Angeles with copal wood carved and painted ram, San Martin Tilcajete

I know that friends Violante and Consuelo Ulrich who continue the William Spratling silver jewelry making tradition in Taxco will be here. (I take study tour goers to meet them in Taxco during the February Textile and Folk Art Study Tour to Tenancingo de Degollado. Spaces open.)

Then, I turn the corner. Que Supresa! Que Milagro! I  see part of my extended family from Teotitlan del Valle and Oaxaca.

Shopping for Oaxaca embroidered blouses

Shopping for Oaxaca embroidered blouses

I had no idea that Pedro Mendoza and his wife Carina Santiago and their son Diego would also be there with their terrific handmade rugs. Carina runs Tierra Antigua Restaurant and Pedro is a weaver/exporter.

Or, that friend Jacobo Angeles drove a truck up from Oaxaca filled with alebrijes made by him and family members in San Martin Tilcajete, in Oaxaca’s Ocotlan valley.

Ortega's Folk Art, Tonala, Jalisco, Mexico

Ortega’s Folk Art, Tonala, Jalisco, Mexico

And, then there are ceramics from Mata Ortiz, and hand-carved whimsical wood figures by Gerardo Ortega Lopez from Tonala, Jalisco.

If you can get to San Diego this weekend, there’s a great Expoventa (show and sale) at Bazaar del Mundo, where you can meet all these artisans and buy directly from them.

Mata Ortiz pottery from Chihuahua, Mexico

Mata Ortiz pottery from Chihuahua, Mexico

Both Pedro and Jacobo tell me that tourism has dropped substantially in Oaxaca in the last month our of fear about the clashes between the federal government and the striking teachers. While Oaxaca’s economy depends on tourism, the teachers have legitimate grievances that need to be addressed. It’s complicated!

Hand-beaded blouses from Puebla, Merry Foss artisan cooperative

Hand-beaded blouses from Puebla, Merry Foss artisan cooperative

Some artisans who have visas and have come to the U.S. to do business for years, are able to cross the border and try to make up for what is lost in the local economy. Instead of talking about building walls, United States leaders need to talk about building bridges.

Mexican doll collection, home of David and Barbara

Mexican doll collection, home of David and Barbara

In the meantime, it takes people like David and Barbara, Robin and Linda, and members of Los Amigos del Arte Popular de Mexico who keep the folk art traditions of Mexico in the forefront, who host artisans for private sales, who promote that Mexico has a rich artistic and cultural heritage that remains vibrant only through support and understanding.

Oaxaca clay nativity scene, private collection

Oaxaca clay nativity scene, private collection

If you personally or an organization you are involved with would like to host an artisan visit to the United States, please contact me. I can facilitate. This means a lot to people to keep their family traditions alive and income flowing.

Pacific Ocean overlook, sunny Southern California day

Pacific Ocean overlook, sunny Southern California day

I’m returning to Oaxaca next week. I’ve been traveling for over a month. This is a great interlude to visit with family and friends. I seem to be happy wherever I am these days! I hope you are contented, too.

Pond sunset, end to a perfect San Diego day

Pond sunset, end to a perfect San Diego day

 

In Mexico City: Popular Art–Folk Art Shopping Hideaway

Tucked behind the tall 17th century heavy wood doors of an imposing colonial residence at Isabel la Catolica 97 is Victor Arts Populares Mexicanas.  There is no sign, only a small poster affixed to the only window facing the street.

Don’t knock on wood, the guard admonished me, after I did several times.  He instructed me to use the original brass knocker now burnished with age.  I smiled, assured him I would behave myself next time, and made my way up to the second floor where there are three rooms stuffed with an amazing collection of new and vintage collectibles from all the important craft villages of Mexico.

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Here I met Pilar Fosado Vazquez (above left) and her assistant.  Pilar continues to run the shop her father founded many years ago.

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Take note:  Hours are limited.  The shop is open 12:00 p.m. to 7:00 p.m. Monday through Friday.  Tel. (55) 55-12-12-63.  Email: victormex@hotmail.com.  There is a Facebook page, too.  But the shop recently relocated and most of the information available online is not updated.

Diego_Frida_July2014-13The family works with a silversmith in the State of Mexico (Estado de Mexico) to recreate outstanding jewelry pieces in the style of Frida Kahlo. Some are embellished with coral, turquoise, garnet, onyx and obsidian.  The workmanship is excellent and the prices are moderate for the quality.

Diego_Frida_July2014-12     There is lots of handmade tin, papier mache, textiles, and the Huichol art is of particular fine quality.  Some of the pieces for sale are over forty years old.

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I searched out this spot to take people who attended the last Looking for Diego Rivera and Frida Kahlo art history tour, where we studied the famed Mexican muralists (Rivera, Orozco and Siquieros) and visited Casa Azul and the Dolores Olmedo Patiño Museum.  There are THREE spaces open for our August repeat program!

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Oaxaca Show & Sale, July 25-26: To Benefit Artisans and Artists at Las Bugambilias B&B

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Shop Mexico–The Artisan Sisters: Oaxaca Carved & Painted Wood Alebrijes

Now that I’m back in North Carolina, I am looking at my Oaxaca folk art collection of whimsical, carved wood and hand-painted alebrijes.  Wow, there are a lot of beautiful alebrijes from San Martin Tilcajete and San Antonio Arrazola, including some by famed Jacobo Angeles and his wife Maria.  It’s now time to sell as I prepare to spend more months each year in Mexico in smaller space.  I brought them here carefully, one by one, over the years with no damage.  I don’t want to risk it going the other way! So, here they are up for sale.  I will definitely consider all good offers, too.

If I don’t sell these here this week, I will list them on eBay.  So don’t hesitate!

1.  From master wood carvers Jacobo and Maria Angeles in San Martin Tilcajete, a carved and painted jaguar mask, $165.

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This is a stunning addition to any mask collection!

Jacobo and Maria Angeles are the most famed woodcarvers of San Martin Tilcajete.  They have exhibited worldwide, are in private collections and their work is impeccable.  They also operate Azucenas Zapoteca Restaurant and have a gallery on Macedonio Alcala in the historic center of Oaxaca.

2.  Flying Hummingbird #1 by Jacobo and Maria Angeles, San Martin Tilcajete, Oaxaca.  This one is hand-painted with all natural dyes — cochineal, nuts, moss. wing span 6″ and from beak to tail, 5″ long. $85 USD.

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3.  Flying Hummingbird #2 (below) by Jacobo and Maria Angeles, San Martin Tilcajete.  Magenta with blue and yellow accents.  Wing span 5″ and beak to tail 5-1/2″.  $60 USD.

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4.  Exquisite Lizard by Rocio Ramirez, Xoxocotlan, Oaxaca. Just look at that tail! This is one entire piece of copal wood, carefully carved and beautifully painted in perfect condition. 18″ long and 10″ wide, from tail to end of left claw!  Impressive.  $295 USD.

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5. Hector Lopez carved this rhinoceros in his home village of Arrazola about seven years ago.  I have had it as a prominent part of my collection ever since.  The painting detail is incredible and it is carved from a single piece of copal wood, except for the detachable tail and ears.  From tail to end of front horn, 17″ long.  Stands 8″ high.  $325 USD.

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6. And, finally, a wonderful Black and White Bear by famed Maria and Candida Jimenez Ojeda, San Martin Tilcajete, Oaxaca. 8″ long x 4″ high x 3″ wide.  Small and mighty.  The detail painting is stunningly Maria! $125 USD.

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Send me an email and please refer to item number and description when inquiring.  Price does not include shipping or insurance.  Please tell me if you want this, along with your mailing address and I will send you an invoice that includes shipping and insurance based on your location.

 

Shop Mexico–The Artisan Sisters Week 13: La Catrina Day of the Dead Figure by Bertha Cruz

The calavera (skeleton) of La Catrina is the symbol of Day of the Dead in Mexico.  The original etching was made by Jose Guadalupe Posada in 1913.  The image has been adapted to fit many other art forms:  clay figures and carved copal wood painted in bright colors by famed Oaxaca folk artists.

 

Just in time for Day of the Dead, we present La Catrina by Bertha Cruz, an amazing alebrije painter from Arrazola.  Bertha began selling independently out of her home about four years ago. She is no longer represented in galleries because she must pay a hefty commission.  So she decided to go out on her own. Her brush details are eensy teensy and exquisite. Her husband, Alfonso Castellanos Ibañez, does the carving but insists that she sign her name because the beauty is in the painting, he says.  She is very collectible and visitors to Oaxaca seek out her work. 14″ high x 5″ wide.  $225.  Includes shipping and packing to anywhere in continental USA.

Send me an email if you are interested in this piece.  We will invoice you via PayPal.  PayPal accepts credit cards and personal checks.