Category Archives: Oaxaca Mexico art and culture

Carol Beron Ceramics Exhibition Opens at ARIPO, September 30

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Carol Beron is a ceramic artist who takes her inspiration from much in Oaxaca, from carved animal figures to pre-Hispanic indigenous organic forms. She lives in New York City and visits Oaxaca often.

At ARIPO Opening reception: Friday, September 30,  4 to 7  p.m.  

Exhibition and sale until October 15, 2016. 

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Where: ARIPO — Oaxaca’s state operated artisans gallery, Garcia Virgil #809, near the aqueduct and Plaza Cruz de la Piedra. Tel: 01 951 514 1354

ARIPO is open Monday through Friday, 9 a.m. to 7 pm., and 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. on Saturday.

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All pieces are for sale and can be picked up on October 15  at ARIPO.

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If you are interest in particular pieces, please contact Carol Beron directly at  cgetrollin@gmail.com

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ExpoVENTA: Mexican Beaded Blouses & Jewelry, Saturday, September 17

RSVP Here!

Mexico Markets Photo Essay from Mexico Travel Photography Facebook Group

We recently completed a five-day challenge to post photos of Mexico Markets on the Facebook group page for Mexico Travel Photography. Members posted 158 photos. We have over 250 members and there’s room for many more!

Next up is a challenge for September 15 and 16: Post ONE photo to honor Mexico Independence Day. Bring out the red, white and green! Do you have something to contribute?

Here is a selection of photos from last week’s Mexico Markets challenge to tempt you to see the full display at the Facebook page site.

Ann Conway, San Cristobal de las Casas market

Ann Conway, San Cristobal de las Casas market

The Mexico Travel Photography group is a bunch of photographers from around the world who love Mexico. We range from beginners to professionals. All levels are welcome and our goal is to share, appreciate and learn from each other!

Gail Schacter, The Burden of Onions

Gail Schacter, The Burden of Onions

We all see things from a different point of view.

Melanie Schulze, Mamey fruit

Melanie Schulze, Mamey fruit

From the close-up texture of this mamey fruit with the taste of creamy yam, to the night shot below during Day of the Dead.

Deby Thompson, Night Market, Xoxocotlan, Oaxaca

Deby Thompson, Night Market, Xoxocotlan, Oaxaca

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Martha Canseco Bennetts, Peppers

Janet Paluch, By the Dozen

Janet Paluch, By the Dozen

Nick Hamblen, Roadside Market

Nick Hamblen, Roadside Market

Markets in Mexico are anywhere and everywhere, even alone by the roadside.

Hollie Taylor, Packing It Up, Puebla

Hollie Taylor, Packing It Up, Puebla

Al Stevens, San Pablo Etla Market

Al Stevens, San Pablo Etla Market

Marnie Fleming, Ropes

Marnie Fleming, Ropes

Who would have thought a tangle of ropes would make a terrific photo? Marnie!

Liz Thomas, Night Market, Xoxocotlan, Oaxaca

Liz Thomas, Night Market, Xoxocotlan, Oaxaca

This photo, above, is of the same Xoxocotlan market stall shot by Deby Thompson above. Look what Liz focused in on.

Norma Schafer, basket weaver Margarita, Benito Juarez Market, Oaxaca

Norma Schafer, basket weaver Margarita, Benito Juarez Market, Oaxaca

Margarita’s face is a constant marvel to me. I’ve been buying woven palm baskets from her for years.

Ana Paula Fuentes, Fruit and Tablecloth

Ana Paula Fuentes, Fruit and Tablecloth

The composition of this photo with the fruit tablecloth backdrop says it all.

There are many outstanding photos on the Facebook Group page I didn’t post here. This is just to tantalize you to go take a look!

Textile Fiestas of Mexico: New Guidebook for Smart Travelers

The book, Textile Fiestas of Mexico: A Traveler’s Guide to Celebrations, Markets and Smart Shopping by Sheri Brautigam and published by Thrums Books, is hot off the press. It’s a comprehensive guide to some of Sheri’s favorite Mexican textile villages and towns. I contributed two chapters!

Textile Fiestas of Mexico, book cover

Textile Fiestas of Mexico, book cover

Sheri invited me to cover Teotitlan del Valle, the Oaxaca rug weaving village where I live, and Tenancingo de Degollado, the ikat cotton rebozo weaving center in the State of Mexico, where I often visit and lead study tours. Of course, the answer was Yes!  I’m happy to say I contributed both the descriptive narrative and photography for these two sections.

Evaristo Borboa Casas, age 92, ikat rebozo backstrap loom weaver

Grand Master Evaristo Borboa Casas, age 92, ikat rebozo backstrap loom weaver

Sheri and I share our secrets with you because our first priority is to support the wonderful, talented Mexican artisans — many of whom are Grand Masters of Mexican Folk Art. Whether you join a tour or get there on your own, you want this book in your back pocket or tote bag for insider tips.

Selection of Teotitlan del Valle wool rugs from the tapestry loom

Selection of Teotitlan del Valle wool rugs from Porfirio Guttierez studio

How You Can Order the Book!

ISBN: 978-0-9964475-8-4
$24.95 trade paperback
120 pages
200 color photographs, map, glossary, and index

Buy your copy at Amazon, ClothRoads, and at your favorite Indie bookstore. Distributed to the book and library trade by Independent Publishers Group. If you live in Oaxaca, the book is soon to be available at Amate Books on Macedonio Alcala.

How to Buy in Mexico

Patrice Wynn is the Mexican distributor for Textile Fiestas of Mexico. She is also selling the book to buyers in Mexico, both at AbraZos, Zacateros 24 in Centro Historico, San Miguel de Allende, and also by mail. Please write to ventas@sanmigueldesigns.com to get details of how you can have it shipped to you in Mexico, either as an individual or as a store.

Here’s a preview of photos I contributed to the chapters on Tenancingo de Degollado and Teotitlan del Valle.

Tenancingo weaver Jesus Zarate with his amazing ikat butterfly rebozo

Tenancingo weaver Jesus Zarate with his amazing ikat butterfly rebozo

Come with me to Tenancingo, February 2-10, 2017 for an ikat textile study tour. We have a few spaces open for single and double occupancy. You’ll meet everyone I talk about in the book!

Knotting the rebozo fringes can take two or three months

Knotting the rebozo fringes can take two or three months

The beauty of the book is that you can use it when you travel independently or as a resource on a guided visit.

Weaver in the Teotitlan del Valle rug market

Weaver in the Teotitlan del Valle rug market

One-day Natural Dye Textile & Weaving Study Tour–November 3, 2017

We tell you how to get there, the best artisans (in our humble opinion) to visit and when the major festivals are scheduled.

We recommend how to negotiate purchases in the markets and from artisans in their homes. What is the fair and ethical way to shop in Mexico? Sheri explains it!

Indigo dye pot, Teotitlan del Valle

Indigo dye pot, Teotitlan del Valle

We help you discern the good from the bad, the better quality from the mediocre.

At the Sunday rebozo market, Tenancingo

At the Sunday rebozo market, Tenancingo de Degollado

And, we give you restaurant and lodging tips — because where to eat and sleep means you will have a more enjoyable experience.

Ancient Zapotec temple stone, Teotitlan del Valle Community Museum

Ancient Zapotec temple stone, Teotitlan del Valle Community Museum

Through description and photos, you can see what to expect before you get there and plan your travels so your time is well-spent.

Carding sheep wool, a woman's tradition to prepare for spinning, dyeing then weaving

Juana Gutierrez cards sheep wool, a woman’s tradition to prepare for spinning

Chapters include Oaxaca, Chiapas, Uruapan and Puebla, plus Estado de Mexico (State of Mexico). You go deep into local markets, cooperatives and regional celebrations.

Ikat rebozos by Evaristo Borboa Casas, Tenancingo de Degollado

Ikat rebozos by Evaristo Borboa Casas, Tenancingo de Degollado

Author Sheri Brautigam owned a textile design studio in San Francisco for twenty years. She has worked as an English Language Fellow for the U.S. Embassy in Mexico, and as a serious collector and purveyor of fine indigenous textiles from Mexico and Guatemala. She sells collector-quality textiles through her online shop, Living Textiles of Mexico, and writes a blog, Living Textiles of Mexico.

Explaining the symbology of the weaving patterns

Omar Chavez Santiago explains the symbology of the weaving patterns

FYI: Many of you know that Teotitlan del Valle is a town of about 6,000 people and 2,000 looms. The major “industry” here is wool tapestry weaving. In the book, I concentrate on a handful of weavers who work only with natural dyes. We are committed to promoting environmental sustainability and respiratory health.

Cleaning a rug woven with naturally dyed wool

Cleaning a rug woven with naturally dyed wool–Federico Chavez Sosa

Starts Today: Mexico Markets 5-Day Photo Challenge

Starts TODAY, Monday, September 5. FIVE-DAY PHOTO CHALLENGE: MEXICO MARKETS. All are welcome to participate at the Facebook Group Mexico Travel Photography.

This is for photography enthusiasts of all levels, including beginners. SHARE to expand participation!

Rules: 1 photo per day. Each photo must be labeled by day, ie. Day 1, Mexico Markets. Day 2, Mexico Markets, etc. with location, if you can.

Let’s see your Mexico’s Markets! And, Happy Labor Day.

Day One, Mexico Markets Photo Challenge. Benito Juarez Market, Oaxaca, Mexico

Day One, Mexico Markets Photo Challenge. Benito Juarez Market, Oaxaca, Mexico