Sweet Teotitlan del Valle Street Dog Needs a Home: Please Help!

My re-entry to Oaxaca included a surprise. FOUR dogs, not three, in my patio.

I am looking for a caring, compassionate person to adopt Beeszween.  Beeszween is Zapotec for Little Deer. Janie named him this because of his long deer-like legs. Janie, who was house sitting for me, would keep him but she goes back to the USA soon. He’s so thin with all his ribs showing that he looks just pitiful. We know he will fill out to be a healthy dog in the right home.

Meet Beeszween from Teotitlan del Valle, a sweet dog who needs a home.

He is neutered. Before Janie arrived, Kalisa took him to Merry Foss’ village spay/neuter clinic three months ago before she returned to San Diego. Thank you, Kalisa.

I already have THREE adopted dogs from the campo and I cannot take one more into my patio. I’m so sorry! I hope you understand.

Beeszween responds to SIT and STAY commands.  He is very loving and loyal.

Can you help?  Write me at norma.schafer@icloud.com to rescue  and adopt this one-year old.  I fear that without a home, he is close to the end of his life.

His eyes say, Please help me!

How did he end up a street dog — or in our case, a campo dog, roaming the fields looking for food and comfort? He was taken in by a neighbor as a puppy to guard the corn crib down the lane. He was tied to the post of the outdoor garage. One day, I saw he had broken loose. He started trailing me, Mamacita, Tia and Butch on our countryside walks and then following my dogs home. He would leave and return. I think whomever had him has stopped feeding him. That’s what happens here.

Janie started feeding Beezie a couple of weeks ago. Of course, I have now succumbed, too. Now, he is hovering at the patio gate, begging and desperate. But, I just cannot manage having FOUR dogs.

Can you help?

 

 

Long Day, Soft Landing to Oaxaca, Mexico — City Mouse, Country Mouse

Life is bimodal. I’m a city mouse in Durham, North Carolina, and a country mouse in Teotitlan del Valle, Oaxaca. Federico says I’m an honorary Zapoteca although I can only say hello and raise a toast in his native language. For the time being, I travel back and forth, with roots in both places with small spaces.

Durham condo life in a restored tobacco warehouse downtown

This is my second day back at the casita in Teotitlan del Valle, Oaxaca, Mexico. It was perfect timing to return. North Carolina was becoming so hot and sultry that it was impossible for me to walk just a mile to the downtown from my loft condo and live without air conditioning. I’ve only lived in the South for 30 years, unlike my native Tar Heel friend Hettie who can’t stand any temperature under 72 degrees F.

Country mouse comes home to Teotitlan del Valle

For the last two nights here, I’ve been sleeping with windows open, fresh air, cool breezes, temps in the mid-70’s. Close to heaven, so to speak.

Tia and Mamacita, always happy to walk with me

The three dogs didn’t skip a beat after my being absent for three months. I was greeted with licks and nudges for petting. Yesterday, I spent most of the time taking photos and nesting in the terrace hammock looking at views, pinching myself.

First limes ever this season, rooftop garden

My house sitter and dog caretaker Janie surprised me with an amazing cactus garden she designed and planted in front of the casita, and vases everywhere filled with fresh flowers. Quite a homecoming!

Fresh flowers everywhere, a welcome home gift from Janie

This is my thirteenth year here. For some reason, I expected culture disconnect but I eased right back into being here. I took the dogs for a two-mile walk out to the far reaches of the village borderlands.

Toros resting in the shade, walk through the campo

Today, after an hour stroll around our daily morning farmer’s market, I set to work in the kitchen making Korean kimchi, adapting the recipe to locally available ingredients.

In the country surrounded by green mountains, fertile valleys

I am far from the craziness of US politics but BuzzFeed keeps buzzing and the New York Times online is within reach. There will be a march here in Oaxaca on Thursday, July 5, 2018 at 2 p.m. at the US Consular Agency to protest government zero tolerance policies that ban Latino immigrants and separate families — starting at IAGO. I’ll be there.

Efficient city kitchen, Durham, NC — Mexico touches everywhere

Country kitchen clutter, Oaxaca, Mexico — US touches everywhere

I wondered when I entered Mexico through Immigration on Thursday night if I might be treated differently, more disdainfully and with suspicion because of these US policies. But, Mexicans are kinder and gentler and I was welcomed back, again.

South Bend, Indiana friends of more than 30 years

This past week was a time of reconnecting with long-time friends in South Bend, Indiana, some of whom I haven’t seen in 30 years. It’s where I lived, raised my family and started my university career.

In the Teotitlan market, $2 USD for a dozen roses

After taking a bus and then taxi from South Bend to Chicago O’Hare, I boarded Aeromexico to connect in Mexico City and take the last flight of the day to Oaxaca. This was a smooth and easy way to get from the US to Mexico. Thankfully, there were no hurricanes.

Mex dogs chilling on the patio. In Durham, outdoor life is on the streets.

My only advice in Mexico City is get to Gate 75 early and watch/listen for the boarding announcements. Most commuter flights within Mexico leave from this gate. They board and depart faster than you can say Buenas Noches.

Janie helps Juanita make fresh beet, carrot, pineapple juice cocktail, 30 pesitos

At the South Bend Farmers Market, breakfast for $4.95 … still

Seriously, On The Mexico-US Border

Seeing Rachel Maddow in tears compelled me to action yesterday. I called and emailed both my Senators Burr and Tillis (R). I made donations to legal defense funds.

I live in North Carolina where gerrymandering has determined national elections. I want to think of these representatives as people of good will with an ethical, compassionate center. I want to be hopeful, still.

Living in a Red state means my voice and my vote matters even more.

  • If you live in a Red state, it’s even more important to call and email.
  • If you are a compassionate Republican, your voice is essential.
  • For all of us, taking action and speaking up matters.

Last night 45 (aka Agent Orange) rescinded his executive order to separate families at the border — an immigration deterrent policy gone mad. The executive order is vague and confusing.


There is no resolution for the already 2,300 infants and children who have already been pulled apart and held in separate facilities. News reports this morning tell that ICE border policy is in confusion and agents don’t know what to do anything differently.

We must not let up.

What to do:

  1. Call both your Senators at their local field offices in the state where you live.
  2. Call your U.S. Congressional Representative at their field office, too.
  3. Send a TEXT to 50409 and write in the Message Box RESIST. This is Resistbot which will ID your Senators and Congressional Representatives. It will walk you through the steps, then email your message to them at the end. Simply, write your message in the message box, enter DONE and it will prompt you for next steps.
  4. Make a Gift to support the legal defense funds at the border, such as RAICES,  https://www.raicestexas.org/  or

    Texas Civil Rights Project (the “Charity”). MoveOn.org Civic Action has acted as the Charity’s agent for the purpose of accepting donations on behalf of the Charity. The funds go direct to the project.

Suggestion About What to Say: Be calm, thoughtful and polite. An aide or a machine will answer. Speak slowly and clearly.

Please tell Senator XXX that the President’s Executive Order is not enough. There must be an immediate plan to reunite the 2,300 infants and children with their parents who have already been separated. This behavior by our government reminds me of Nazi Germany and dictatorships around the world. It is inhumane and unconscionable. Please tell Senator XXX to take a stand to reunite these children with their parents now. I’m from (name your state).

***

These are painful and perilous times. I begin my journey back to Oaxaca tomorrow. I wonder how immigration will go for me in Mexico City as I transit through. Shame is what I feel. I ask myself, does despair and hope go hand-in-hand as Paul Schrader questions in his important, just released film, First Reformed. I like to think we can choose to be hopeful and push despair down. Despair is numbing, depressive, serves to subdue us. We cannot be subdued.

 

 

 

A Word About Chiapas From Trish Tieger

I want to share this with you. It came to me this week unsolicited from Trish Tieger who lives along the Hudson River Valley in New York State. She traveled with us to Chiapas in 2018 and wanted me to know about her experience.

Dear Norma,

So much time has passed since we returned from our (or at least it was for me) fabulous time in Chiapas. Life got away from me and I never did write to say “thank you.”  The people and places we got to see, by way of your thoughtful scheduling and excellent contacts, were amazing. There is no way that if I arrived solo in San Cris, that I could have found my way so well into the countryside.

Your trip provided everything that I was hoping for—I was seeking a speck of adventure—and a great desire to be in contact with indigenous people—either in Mexico or the Andes. As I was working on this half-baked plan, I was excited when a friend came up with your name and itinerary. It never had occurred to me that one could find tours that went out with very small groups. (The large ones, with people packed onto tour buses and going to “tourist sites” had never held interest for me and yet I was hesitant about going where I wanted all by myself.)

What you offered was the perfect match for my needs of the moment. It is very cool that you have made a life of taking like-minded travelers to locations that are lesser known and not so available. Anyway, thank you so much for the terrific ride. It was wonderful.

Best wishes,

Trish Tieger

There are five openings for our February 27-March 8, 2019, Chiapas Textile Study Tour Deep Into the Maya World. Step into the adventure with us!

Here are some links to posts I wrote about the last trip:

Women make, sell, suckle babes in Magdalenas Aldama, Chiapas

Andrea Diaz Hernandez weaves for eight months, San Andres Larrainzar

Mexico Bejeweled Mostly Silver Jewelry Sale

SOLD. #1 Oaxaca Gold Filigree vintage, Teotitlan del Valle

This will be my last “for sale” post of the season! I’m on my way back to Oaxaca on June 22 via Chicago for a stopover to visit friends. From there, it will be Aeromexico connecting through Mexico City to Oaxaca on June 28. It will be good to get back to my other home and those three campo dogs! Let’s see if they missed me.

It’s time to part with some treasures that have been in my collection for a while. Yes, I did wear them, so they aren’t brand new. A few pieces are vintage. A few pieces are not being made anymore. They all reflect the best quality silversmithing that Mexico has to offer.

To make a purchase please send an email to norma.schafer@icloud.com

  1. Indicate what you want to buy by NUMBER.
  2. Tell me your mailing address.
  3. Prices do not include mailing. I will add $8 per package for mailing within the US. For Canada or international, I’ll send you mailing cost before I invoice you.
  4. Order and pay by Wednesday, June 20, 2018
  5. Note: The last day I will accept an order is June 20. That will give me time to invoice you, for you to pay with PayPal and for me to package and mail to you.
  6. Thank you very much for your consideration.

#1 detail, Oaxaca vintage 12 Kt. Gold Filigree

SOLD. #1 was bought to support my neighbor who needed to build a kitchen. She begged me to buy this pair of earrings so of course, I did, though I already had a similar pair! What’s to do? Sometimes, we call it the Gringa Tax. The price to live in an indigenous village. Okay, so I’m finally getting around to selling these. You put the hook in through the back of your lobe and connect it to the gold disk. Measures: 1-1/2″ in diameter. Very fine filigree work. $285 USD.

#2 Sterling Silver Filigree earrings

SOLD. #2 sterling silver filigree earrings are made by Oaxaca silversmith Mario Perez. He used to share a shop on the Alacala with Jacobo and Maria Angeles Ojeda. His studio is near Atzompa. Exceptional quality silver filigree.  These earrings hook from the front to the back and have a French closure. Measures 1-1/4″ diameter. $195 USD.

#3 Sterling Silver Filigree Baskets

SOLD. #3. I bought these some years ago from Teotitlan del Valle painter, designer and weaver Pantaleon Ruiz Martinez. He was working with a Oaxaca master to create one-of-a-kind filigree earrings. I admired them for their beauty and delicate workmanship. Since then, I’ve migrated to bolder, so these can be yours. Perfect condition, only worn a few times. French closure. Measures 1-3/4″ long. $145 USD.

#4 famous designer earrings

SOLD. #4 was handcrafted by Brigitte and Ivan, the French silversmiths who worked in Oaxaca for over 20 years. Their legacy is renown. These are made using the lost wax casting technique developed in pre-Hispanic Mexico. Measures 2″ long from were the hook hangs from the earlobe hole. $135 USD.

#5 sterling silver bracelet–a statement piece

SOLD. #5 is also designed and made by Brigitte Huet and her husband Ivan under their mark Kandart. It is a weighty sterling silver with a slide closure in the style of the grand masters of Taxco. I have priced this at $400 USD, less than its original cost. It is a work of art. Rarely worn. 7″ long.

#6 William Spratling earrings

SOLD. #6  — sterling silver cast earrings from the William Spratling workshop in Taxco, Guerrero, Mexico from the original molds that Spratling used in Taxco’s silver heyday in the 40’s and 50’s.  They are on posts. Lightweight because the triangle shape is hollow. Patina. $125 USD.

#6 back detail

#7 Sterling and Alpaca Bangle Mix

#7 is a group of 11 bangle bracelets for a smaller wrist. The diameter opening is 2-1/2 inches. The alpaca is a metal that looks like silver, popular in the 50’s and 60’s and there are four of these with enamel work in white, black and turquoise. The remaining seven are sterling silver. $95 USD for the set.

#8 Cowgirl Beans Necklace

SOLD. #8 is from Cuetzalan Puebla where beans rule! They are strung on a sturdy woven twine and knotted. Pair with other necklace strands to add a fun look. Measures about 24 inches long. $27 USD.

#9 Chiapas Coin Necklace

SOLD. #9 is from Magdalenas Aldama where the ladies string glittery glass beads, use colorful braided ties, and sell them. A penny for your thoughts. These are embellished with five Mexican 50 centavo pieces to add interest to what is an already attention-getting neck adornment. Measures 36″ end-to-end. Tie it however long or short you want. $65 USD.

#10 Quetzalcoatl ring — Serpent God

SOLD. #10 is another fine piece by Brigitte Huet. Its Mayan symbol is Quetzalcoatl the serpent-god who could transform himself. Sterling silver made using the lost wax casting technique. I’m not sure of the ring size. I think it may be a 7.  $115 USD.

Inside #10 quetzalcoatl ring

#11 Silver and Coral Earrings from Patzcuaro, Michoacan

SOLD. #11 are made by Kutzi jewelers, one of the few jewelry studios still in existence in Patzcuaro, Michoacan. All hand-wrought. Measures 2-1/2″ long from where the hook hangs in your earlobe. $110 USD.

#12 Love Bird sterling silver, onyx and coral earrings, Estado de Mexico

#12 are made by the talented Mazahua people from the State of Mexico. I bought them in Mexico City from Victor Arte Popular. Pilar Fosado’s father worked with the artisans and collaborated on the designs. Not easy to find these any more. Put into your ear from the back to the front. $135 USD.

#13 Love Birds #2 w/ Garnets and Coral, hooks

#13 are another version of the Love Birds with garnets and coral drops. This version has a hook that you put through your ear from front to back. Measures 3″ long. $135 USD.

#14 Lady Bracelet, sterling silver

#14, Brigitte Huet called this bracelet Lady. The workmanship is spectacular with lots of intricate and detailed carving in the wax which was picked up in the silver during the casting technique that uses the sling. Easy to use toggle closure. Measures 7-1/2″ long. $350 USD.

#14 detail of Lady Bracelet

#15 Münecas (Dolls) Necklace

SOLD. #15 is a fun, hand-painted Folk Art doll necklace from the 70’s strung with glass beads. Measures 20″ long. $45 USD.

#16 Navajo Pearls, New Mexico

SOLD. #16. Since New Mexico was part of New Spain and then Mexico before it was appropriated by the USA, I don’t feel at all bad about including this pretty strand of Navajo sterling silver beads in this grouping. Adjustable length for longer or shorter look. Measures 18″ end-to-end. Bead diameter is about 4 mm. Good for hanging a pendant. $65 USD.

#18 Spratling Jaguar pendant, copper with lapis lazuli inlay

#18 is a contemporary Spratling piece made with the traditional Spratling mold in the Taxco, Guerrero, Mexico studio where he lived and worked. It is stamped Taller Spratling. Pendant measures 3-3/4″ wide x 3″ high and the necklace is 19″ long with copper findings. $85 USD.

#19 Spratling Pre-Hispanic Monkey Pendant

#19 is marked Taller Spratling and is a contemporary studio piece from the Spratling workshop in Taxco, but made from one of the original Spratling molds. I saw the original clay figure at the museum in Tututepec, Oaxaca. This piece  copper inlaid with green turquoise. Measures 1-3/4″ x 2-1/4″ long. Put it on a chain at whatever length you prefer! $95 USD.

#20 designer sterling silver bracelet

#20 is another beauty from designer Brigitte Huet using the lost wax cast technique for sterling silver. Measures 7-1/2″ long and 1-1/4″ wide, with cut-out and feather carved motifs. $395 USD.

#21, #22, #23 Earrings

Top #21: Vintage sterling silver and pearls from Puebla, Mexico. 2″ long. $125 USD.

Middle #22: Artemio Rodriguez Taxco designer, 1-1/2″ long. $125 USD.

Bottom #23: Artemio Rodriguez Taxco designer, 1-1/2″ long. $125 USD.

#24 filigree silver and pearl necklace

SOLD. #24 is a Mazahua piece I bought at Victor Arte Popular. Delicate and beautifully made. $85 USD.

#25 Fish from Lake Patzcuaro

#25 is a collector’s piece with handmade silver beads and hand carved and stamped fishes suspended from dried red beans — all perfect. Piece is from the 70’s or 80’s. Hand-made chain and clasp. 17″ long. $395 USD.

#26 Eagle Pendant

#26 Eagle Pendant back

SOLD. #26 is sterling silver made in the lost wax cast technique by Brigitte Huet. Measures 4″ long x 1-1/2″ wide. $195.

This is probably enough to keep you interested for a while!

Remember, please make your orders as soon as possible. I will need to send invoices and receive funds by Wednesday, June 20, 2018, to complete our transaction and get your pieces in the mail to you before I leave North Carolina.

Thank you very much for your support.

Norma