Tag Archives: Eric Chavez Santiago

Color Intensity of Natural Dyes from Oaxaca Sources

Today I changed the banner of the blog to give you a picture of the range of intense colors we got from the natural dye workshop we just completed with Eric Chavez Santiago.  Eric is one of Mexico’s most knowledgeable dye masters and his techniques include how to extract the color without wasting it.

DyeWorkshopJan_Group-74

We started with three colors only — cochineal, indigo and fustic — red, blue and yellow.  By over-dyeing and using various shades of natural wool, plus the chemistry of using an acid or a base with the color, we were able to get the amazing, rich colors that you see in the banner photo. They are all colorfast.

DyeWorkshopJan_Group-24 DyeWorkshopJan_Group-61

I will be writing more about this in the next few days and publishing more photos.  But in the meantime, I wanted you to see what our group accomplished during this three-day workshop.

DyeWorkshopJan_Group-37

The next natural dye workshop is in March 2014. Let me know if you want to participate.

DyeWorkshopJan_Group-11

 

Oaxaca Rug Exhibition + Sale @ Dos Perros, Durham, NC, October 5, 5:30-8:30 PM

All Friends of Oaxaca Are Invited!

Inviting Friends of Oaxaca: Meet the Chavez Family Weavers

Eric Chavez Santiago, director of education at the Museo Textil de Oaxaca (textile museum) and his sister Janet of the Galeria Fe y Lola, will be with us in Raleigh-Durham-Chapel Hill the week of October 4.    We will be hosting several welcome receptions for them.  They’ll be bringing naturally dyed, hand-woven wool rugs for exhibit and sale,  and will talk about the family tapestry weaving and natural dyeing process.  Both are very knowledgeable professionals, university educated, bi-lingual and have a wealth of information about indigenous textiles throughout the State of Oaxaca.  We hope you can join us.  Please send me an email to RSVP: normahawthorne@mac.com

Tuesday, October 5, 2010, 5:30-8:30 p.m. Dos Perros– A Mexican Place,  200 N. Mangum St., Downtown Durham.

Join us at Dos Perros to meet Eric and Janet, chat, and see their extraordinary rugs.  We’ll provide the nibbles.  No host bar.  Stay on for dinner if you like.  Call the restaurant to make your dinner reservations (919) 956-2750.  Parking is free in the city lot across the street.  (They make a fabulous Cayenne Mango Margarita.)

THURSDAY, OCTOBER 7, 6:00-9:00 P.M. PRIVATE RESIDENCE, CHAPEL HILL, NC.

Email normahawthorne@mac.com to RSVP and for directions.

We are also organizing an event for Pittsboro, NC, during that week, so stay tuned for details to come.  Thanks, Norma

Three Documentary Videos Produced at 2010 Film Making Workshop

YouTube Channel  http://www.youtube.com/user/normahawthorne

Rescate Seda features the taller of Arte y Seda and the family of Aurora Contreras and Reynoldo Sosa, written and directed by filmmakers Sheri Brautigam and Pam Holland.  The interview was conducted in Spanish and translated to English subtitles.  The film, below, features the labor-intensive process of growing silkworms, cultivating the cocoons, spinning the silk and weaving it, then dyeing it with natural materials.

Pantaleon Ruiz Martinez: Pintor de Teotitlan del Valle was written and directed by filmmakers Laura Dunne and Eric Chavez Santiago.  The interview was conducted in Spanish and translated to English subtitles.  The film, below, features the oil paintings and weavings of Pantaleon who is a noted Oaxacan artist.

Magdalena’s Traditional Tortillas was written and directed by filmmakers Lauren Waits and Dara Stillman.  The interview was conducted in Zapotec and translated to English subtitles.  Magdalena is one of the owners of Las Granadas Bed and Breakfast in Teotitlan del Valle, Oaxaca.

These three films were produced during the one week intensive documentary filmmaking workshop held in February 2010 in Teotitlan del Valle, Oaxaca.  Participants were novice to intermediate level students taught by Erica Rothman, Nighlight Productions LLC, Durham, NC, and Jim Haverkamp, also of Durham, who teaches at the Duke University Center for Documentary Studies.  Executive Producer of the program is Norma Hawthorne, Oaxaca Cultural Navigator LLC.

Here is the photo album from the workshop:

http://picasaweb.google.com/10235250516489975217

Weaving a Curve: A Documentary Short Film

Eric Chavez Sosa and I made this six minute short documentary film during the January 31-February 6 workshop held by Oaxaca Cultural Navigator LLC in Teotitlan del Valle.  It was our first film making collaboration and we were definitely novices!   Here it is:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8UHCPpaap3E

“Weaving a Curve” featuring master weaver Federico Chavez Sosa.  He talks about the techniques he learned from his father and another village master who taught him to weave in the style of Francisco Toledo.  At the age of 17, Federico was an expert weaver.  To weave a curve and perfect the technique requires discipline and practice.  He remembers taking the yarn out and trying again, and again, and again.  Federico loves to weave, and the process for him is both relaxing and fun.  He also explains how he uses natural dyes to prepare the wool, another sign of a master weaver.  As the camera pans the village and the sacred Zapotec site of mount Picacho, Federico talks about the meaning of weaving for him personally and how satisfying it is when his work is appreciated by collectors.   For Federico, mastery means the blending of traditional and contemporary designs, the true mark of an artist, and the timeless quality of linking past with future.

Eric and I didn’t have time to finish this piece — it is in Spanish without subtitles.  So, please forgive us and enjoy the visuals if you don’t completely understand the language.  Maybe someday soon, we’ll add the subtitles!

I also want to acknowledge the mastery of our workshop instructors, Erica Rothman of Nighlight Productions, Durham, NC, and Mikel Barton, also of Durham.  They were fabuloso!

The process:  for five days were were immersed in a learning laboratory experience in the village of Teotitlan del Valle, Oaxaca.  We after two days of classroom instruction and watching examples of documentary footage, we took to the cameras to practice interview techniques and shooting b-roll.  We had 60 minutes of tape to use with the goal of producing a 3-5 minute finished video.  Unfortunately for us, we used about 20 minutes to practice shooting b-roll which turned out mostly to be sunrise and clouds.  You can see a snippet in our opening scene.