Tag Archives: folk art

Oaxaca Arts & Artisan ExpoVenta–Show and Sale, This Weekend at Las Bugambilias B&B

ExpoBug_NewDon Arturo Hernandez, who just returned from the Santa Fe International Folk Art Market, is one of the artisans who joins us this Friday and Saturday for a curated ExpoVenta — Show and Sale.  Arturo works only with naturally dyed wool and cotton. He creates glorious scarves and shawls with elaborate hand-tied fringes.  Stunning to wear and drape around you.  He is also working with ikat, dyeing part of the yarn, which results in some beautiful, assymetrical patterns that collectors love.

Also joining us is the family of Viviana Hipolito Maves, Grand Master of Oaxaca Folk Art, recognized for her handmade beeswax candles that are decorated with flowers, flags and birds.  The molds she uses are made of wood and inherited from her grandmother. These candles adorn the Teotitlan del Valle church and are presented to families at special life cycle events.  She will bring tapers that you can use in your home, too.

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Oaxaca’s Grand Master of Pottery Angelica Delfina Vasquez Cruz

Overlooking the Oaxaca valley at the top of the Santa Maria Atzompa hill is the pottery studio of Angelica Delfina Vasquez Cruz.  She has been recognized as one of the great masters of Oaxaca folk art by Fomento Cultural Banamex, the foundation that recognizes the best crafts people of Mexico.

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We visited Angelica at her home and studio after taking a guided visit around Monte Alban, led by our excellent licensed tour guide Rene Cabrera Arroyo who is very knowledgeable and gives an in-depth discussion of the archeological site.

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Atzompa was a satellite city of Monte Alban and it’s artisans provided the clay vessels and altar pieces for the Zapotec religious and political leaders.

The skill to learn the traditional craft is passed from generation to generation and Angelica learned from her father, who learned from his father before him.  Helping her today is her daughter (above left), an artist in her own right.  Angelica’s granddaughter, a child of about three years old, brings her tools and clay as she constructed a devil for us — one of Angelica’s favorite figures.

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Angelica works in local clay.  The colors  that decorate the pieces come from rocks that are ground on the metate (ancient stone hand grinder) to make a powder, that is then reconstituted with water.

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The cookware, all lead-free, is constructed in the traditional method and is then wood-fired.   A gas kiln is used to fire the more elaborate, larger figures that can be used outdoors for garden art.

Contact: Voces del Barro, Angelica Delfina Vasquez Cruz, Ceramics, Independencia 637, Santa Maria Atzompa, Oaxaca, Mexico, Tel. 951-558-9061, Cellular 044-951-102-0149.  Email: vocesdelbarro@outlook.com

 

 

In Mexico City: Popular Art–Folk Art Shopping Hideaway

Tucked behind the tall 17th century heavy wood doors of an imposing colonial residence at Isabel la Catolica 97 is Victor Arts Populares Mexicanas.  There is no sign, only a small poster affixed to the only window facing the street.

Don’t knock on wood, the guard admonished me, after I did several times.  He instructed me to use the original brass knocker now burnished with age.  I smiled, assured him I would behave myself next time, and made my way up to the second floor where there are three rooms stuffed with an amazing collection of new and vintage collectibles from all the important craft villages of Mexico.

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Here I met Pilar Fosado Vazquez (above left) and her assistant.  Pilar continues to run the shop her father founded many years ago.

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Take note:  Hours are limited.  The shop is open 12:00 p.m. to 7:00 p.m. Monday through Friday.  Tel. (55) 55-12-12-63.  Email: victormex@hotmail.com.  There is a Facebook page, too.  But the shop recently relocated and most of the information available online is not updated.

Diego_Frida_July2014-13The family works with a silversmith in the State of Mexico (Estado de Mexico) to recreate outstanding jewelry pieces in the style of Frida Kahlo. Some are embellished with coral, turquoise, garnet, onyx and obsidian.  The workmanship is excellent and the prices are moderate for the quality.

Diego_Frida_July2014-12     There is lots of handmade tin, papier mache, textiles, and the Huichol art is of particular fine quality.  Some of the pieces for sale are over forty years old.

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I searched out this spot to take people who attended the last Looking for Diego Rivera and Frida Kahlo art history tour, where we studied the famed Mexican muralists (Rivera, Orozco and Siquieros) and visited Casa Azul and the Dolores Olmedo Patiño Museum.  There are THREE spaces open for our August repeat program!

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Don Jose Garcia Antonino: In the Pottery Studio

If you blink you will miss the turn-off to the village of San Antonino Castillo Velasco, just before arriving in Ocotlan de Morelos, where our friend Don Jose Garcia, known as the blind potter, lives and works. Some years ago, Don Jose developed cataracts and without expensive treatment, he lost most of his vision.

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Along with his wife, son, daughter and son-in-law, the family studio is a folk art haven for primitive pottery fired in a wood kiln that represents, for the most part, Don Jose’s vision of Oaxaca village life. He has magic hands and has taught his family well.

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Usually, people make this visit on busy Ocotlan market day Friday. Yesterday, Tuesday, it was quieter and we had the route to ourselves, except for the occasional donkey straying onto the highway.  During our visit we discovered hidden treasures: sculpted bulls, marigold decorated planters, face urns, regal figures of Tehuana women carrying bouquets of lilies, pregnant mermaids and proud couples entangled in dance.

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I always love bringing Oaxaca visitors here. The family appreciates the support and people are always mesmerized by the creativity. There are plenty of small things that aren’t too heavy that can be wrapped and brought home in a suitcase. I guarantee you will love the mermaids playing musical instruments and the jumble of clay figures everywhere.

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Allow a full day to go, return, visit and have lunch at Azucenas Zapotecas in San Martin Tilcajete.  You will want to stop at the women’s cooperative in San Antonino to browse the intricately embroidered blouses, at the wood-carving studios in San Martin Tilcajete, and look at Rodolfo Morales‘ stunning murals in the Ocotlan municipal building. If you have time, visit Abigail Mendoza in Santo Tomas Jalieza, too.

How to get there:  Travel down the Ocotlan highway.  Pass San Martin Tilcajete, the wood carving village. Turn right at the sign for San Antonino Castillo Velasco. Go to Libertad and turn right.  Turn left on Independencia.  Look for #24 painted on the door. On the roof are two large clay lions to guard the gate.  Knock hard!

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Extraordinary: Yanhuitlan, Oaxaca and Ceramic Artist Manuel Reyes

Off the beaten path and definitely a must-see, Santo Domingo Yanhuitlan is a small Mixtec pueblo located about an hour-and-a-half north of Oaxaca city, off the Carretera Nacional toll road to Mexico City.

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It is the home of an extraordinary Dominican Church whose massive stone architecture is reminiscent of the finest European churches, complete with flying buttresses and elegant arched ceilings. Six thousand indigenous people constructed it beginning in the mid-16th century.

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Ceramic artist, sculptor and painter Manuel Reyes lives here, too, with his wife Marisela, also an accomplished artist, and their two children. They are what draw us to this place since their work is not sold in Oaxaca city. They have been exhibited in galleries throughout the United States and recognized in numerous contemporary art journals and books.

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Manuel understudied with potters from throughout Oaxaca state and has been working with clay for fifteen years.  He uses a gas kiln and fires his work at 900-1,200 degree Fahrenheit temperatures, unusual for the region where most clay work is low fire, cooked in a shallow wood-fire kiln.  Manuel gets his red clay from pits in San Jeronimo Silacayoapilla, not far from his home in Tlaxiaco.  He says the clay from here is the strongest, the best.

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Yanhuitlan is Marisela’s home.  This is where they have created their life and work together.  The children are also collaborating, making small clay figures and painting on canvas.

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The clay is painted with natural mineral pigments that Manuel gets from the local region.  Some of his work is primitive.  Other pieces are highly polished polychrome with three or four colors.

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Pre-Hispanic designs on clay come from pottery shards that Manuel finds in the region.

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Marisela and Manuel invite us to join them for lunch.  It is a homemade red mole with rice, black beans, fresh tortillas, and another type of tortilla, rougher, denser, made with wheat flour by Marisela’s mother.  I pass on the mezcal because I’m driving!  The head sculpture is a napkin holder.  Magnifico.

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The church is one of the most important colonial sites in Mexico. Why was it constructed in this tiny town that seems to  have little or no importance today?  Yanhuitlan was on a major pre-Hispanic trade route and the Mixtec temple there was a very important indigenous religious site.

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The Spanish imported the European silk worm and Yanhuitlan became the center of silk cultivation for export.  Silk, along with cochineal, made Yanhuitlan an important economic center.  Hence, this imposing church — extraordinary and definitely worth the visit in its own right.  Note the Mixtec carving embedded into the church wall.  A practice for attracting and converting locals.

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Couple the stop with a visit to the home studio of ceramic artist and sculptors Manuel and Marisela Reyes and you have a very satisfying day-long excursion to explore the art and creativity that is Oaxaca.

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How to get there:  Go north from Oaxaca on the Cuota–toll-road–to Mexico City.  Exit at Nochixtlan.  Turn left and go over the toll road bridge.  Continue northwest. Follow the road signs to Yanhuitlan.  The church can be seen from several miles away.  To find Marisela and Manuel Reyes, go to Aldama Street which faces the side entrance of the church.  Drive until the end.  Their house is across from the Calvario church (metal dome), which is part of the original convent.  coloresdeoaxaca@yahoo.com.mx or call 951-562-7008 for an appointment.

Special thanks to Francine, Jo Ann and Tom for guiding me there!