Tag Archives: Mango

Oaxaca Inspired Sweet-Savory Orange Chicken Recipe: Mango and Carrots

My first day back in Teotitlan del Valle, Oaxaca, after a six-week Durham, North Carolina hiatus. I had to drive La Tuga, my 2004 Honda Element to Tlacolula for clutch repair, so I handed 200 pesos (the equivalent of $11 USD) to Federico and asked him to pick up a few things for me at the village market. My cupboards (and refrigerator) were bare.

On the cook top, mango carrot orange chicken

I specified only a bit of chicken, some fruit and veggies. He returned with four carrots, four Ataulfo mangoes — now in season, two onions, one orange pepsicum, four red apples, four chayote squash and some limes. The key seemed to be the number four. Oh, yes, two chicken drumsticks and two thighs equal four.

So, I give you Sweet-Savory Orange Chicken with Mango and Carrots.

Utensils: four-quart, oven-proof clay baker or stainless steel pot, paring knife, utility knife, large spoon. You might want to use a slow cooker/crock pot. That would work, too.

Ingredients:

  • 2 chicken thighs and 2 chicken drumsticks, skinned
  • 2 teaspoons salt and fresh ground black pepper, or to taste
  • 3 carrots, cleaned and peeled, sliced 1/4 inch thickness
  • 1 white onion, large diced
  • 2 Ataulfo mangoes, cut as shown in photo
  • 2 red apples, skinned, sliced thin
  • 1 orange pepsicum (sweet pepper), diced
  • 1 very small mild red chili pepper, seeded and stemmed
  • 4 cups water

Add salt (I prefer sea salt) and fresh ground pepper to taste

Combine all ingredients. Put pot on top of heat diffuser. Cook on slow simmer for two-to-three hours.  Serve first course as a consomme/chicken broth.  Serve second course of chicken with mango/carrot melange over steamed rice, accompanied by fresh steamed chayote or zucchini squash.

I bet you could make this in a crock pot, too.

How cut a mango: lengthwise to separate two halves from seed

Serves two to four, depending on appetites.

Some years ago, many, in fact, I owned a gourmet cooking school and cookware shop in South Bend, Indiana. It was called Clay Kitchen.  I contracted with famous chefs from around the world to teach, and taught a few classes myself. My preference, still, is to see what ingredients I have at hand and make something up. This one, today, tastes pretty darn good and you should smell my kitchen!

A remaining pepper from my winter terrace garden, seeded, crumbled

Clay Kitchen, Inc. is a memory. We were in business for just under five years during one of the roughest financial downturns of the early 80’s when interest rates on inventory climbed to over 20 percent. Pre-internet, a Google search only comes up with our Indiana corporation registration and dissolution.  There is no other documentation.

My business partner then remains an important friend now. We modeled ourselves after Dean & DeLuca in NYC and aspired to greatness. When we closed, we cried and moved on.

Oaxaca Tropical Fruit + Tomato Ginger Chutney Recipe: With Some Heat!

Tropical Fruit + Tomato Ginger Chutney atop Boulanc's walnut infused rye bread

Tropical Fruit + Tomato Ginger Chutney atop Boulanc’s walnut infused rye bread

I’ve been sequestered in my Teotitlan del Valle casita for some days now (without internet connection), more out of choice than anything. Best to hide from the heat of the day under the ceiling fan with a sewing or cooking project.

Saucepan with fruit and spices before taking the heat

Saucepan with fruit and spices before taking the heat

So, after a trip to the Tlacolula market on Sunday where I saw an overabundance of fresh mango and papaya piled to the rooftops, I had to have some.  Then, there were the tomatoes, everywhere.  Did you know that tomatoes are one of Mexico’s gifts to the world?

A full pot before the cooking begins!

A full pot as the cooking gets underway!

I went home and made up this recipe for a chutney jam that is great on toast or to accompany meat, poultry fish or top on steamed veggies and rice.

Lime juice and zest makes this recipe tangy sweet a la Oaxaca

Lime juice and zest makes this recipe tangy sweet a la Oaxaca

Ingredients:

  • 1 large, ripe mango, peeled and cubed (1/2″ cubes)
  • 1 small, ripe papaya, peeled, seeded, cubed (1/2″ cubes)
  • 1 small, ripe pineapple, peeled, cored and cubed (1/2″ cubes)
  • 8 plum tomatoes, peeled (score top, immerse in boiling water for 30 seconds until skin can be removed), and quartered
  • 2 medium white onions, peeled, julienne cut
  • 6 cloves garlic, peeled, whole
  • 3 sticks cinnamon
  • 2 hot red peppers (see example)
  • 6 cubes of candied ginger, diced fine (can substitute candied kumquat)
  • juice of six small limes to equal 1/2 c. liquid
  • zest from 2 limes
  • 3 cups granulated natural cane sugar
I grow these peppers in a pot on my rooftop terrace. They add the heat!

I grow these peppers in a pot on my rooftop terrace. They add the heat! They are either Fresno or Serrano peppers. Not exactly sure!

Put all fruit and spices together into a six quart saucepan. Add lime juice and zest. Stir in sugar. Stir well. Put saucepan on a heat diffuser over low heat for temperature control and so bottom of pan doesn’t burn. Sugar and juices will dissolve together into a thin syrup with fruit floating around. Bring to simmer.

Note: Remove the peppers mid-way through the cooking process if you don’t like spicy.

Continue cooking on simmer, stirring frequently, until liquid reduces by 50% and thickens to a jam consistency. You can use a thermometer or test for doneness if liquid drops in thick globules from a metal spoon raised about 12″ above the sauce pan.

When it's done, it looks like this. Of course you can always sample for thickness.

When it’s done, it looks like this. Of course you can always sample for thickness.

We live at 6,000 feet altitude here in Oaxaca, so cooking takes time. The chutney jam was ready after about 2 hours on the burner. Patience here is a virtue!

The lowest flame on my stove. Note the heat diffuser.

The lowest flame on my stove. Note the heat diffuser.

Refrigerate to eat within the next week or two. Or, process for 10 minutes in canning jars in a water bath until the tops seal.

I'll freeze a small batch and eat the rest. Maybe you'll come for dinner?

I’ll freeze a small batch and eat the rest. Maybe you’ll come for dinner?

Tips: Last week I used cantaloupe and did not use tomatoes or pineapple. I also substituted kumquat for ginger. You could also add thin slices of oranges and lemons instead of the lime and use 1/4 c. vinegar. Muy sabroso!

Candied ginger, my stash from Pittsboro, North Carolina, used with consideration.

Candied ginger, my stash from Pittsboro, North Carolina, used with consideration.

I want to acknowledge two friends who gave me recipe inspiration:  Natalie Klein from South Bend, Indiana, and David Levin from Oaxaca and Toronto. Natalie is a friend of 40+ years who shared her tomato ginger chutney recipe with me and I have adapted it many times, even canning and selling it.

Close-up of the fruit and spice medley

Close-up of the fruit and spice medley

David (and friend Carol Lynne) returned from Southeast Asia a few months ago where they took cooking classes. David has made chutney ever since. He inspired me to try my own hand at the concoction.

Lime zest sits on pile of julienned white onions

Lime zest sits on pile of julienne white onions

More years ago than I care to count, I owned and operated a gourmet cookware shop, cooking school, and cafe. It’s in my DNA.

Recipe: Fresh Peach Mango Tomato Salsa for a Crowd

Thinking of Oaxaca and Guelaguezta this week?  There’s no better flavor or memory of Mexico than using fresh tomatoes from the garden for salsa.  I had a couple of peaches and mangoes ripe ready and needing to be eaten.  Plus, Stephen had harvested a couple of huge purple-red tomatoes from the organic garden plot yesterday.  Time to make some salsa.  And, I had enough ingredients to make enough for a crowd or to eat through the week atop whatever: roast chicken, pinto beans, salad, blue corn tortilla chips.

 

 

 

 

 

Bonus:  lesson on how to cut a mango!

Ingredients 

  • 2 large tomatoes
  • 2 peaches
  • 1 large mango
  • 1 Vidalia onion
  • cilantro or basil
  • Salt to taste (I like sea salt)
  • 1 T. olive oil
  • 1/4 t. red pepper flakes
  • 1 T. Valentina hot Mexican sauce
  • juice of one lime
Stand mango on short end and using a serrated knife cut in two halves. close to flat pit.  You can feel the pit as you cut.
Score each half like a crossword puzzle grid or checkerboard.  I use the tip of a sharp paring knife. See the flat pit behind the tomato?
Fold the scored mango half back as you see in this photo above.
Cut the cubes from the skin and put into your mixing bowl. Cut the peach in half, remove the pit, and cut into 1/2″ cubes.  Add to bowl.
Using a serrated knife so you don’t lose juice, slice and cube the tomatoes into similar 1/2″ cubes.  Cut the stalk end off the onion.  Peel away the skin. Leave the root end in tact.  Cut through the onion in a cross-hatch checkerboard up to the root.  Stand it on its side and slice through.  This will give you uniform dice.
Add the tomatoes and onion to the bowl.  Stir.
Dice cilantro to yield 1/4-1/2 cup.  (You can substitute fresh basil, if you prefer.)  Add salt, starting with about 2 t. and taste.  Add the dried red pepper and Valentina.  Add lime juice.  Stir. Taste.  Correct the seasoning.  Finish with olive oil, stir and refrigerate for at least one hour until flavors blend.  This yields about 5 cups of salsa.
Enjoy!  Buen Provecho!

HOT Mango Salsa Paint Job for the Kitchen Wall

Juicy Oaxaca Colors: Hot Mango Salsa for the Kitchen Wall

Stephen is in Oaxaca. The last time he went to Oaxaca solo I painted the kitchen back splash terra cotta. I have a yearning in this dreary intersection between winter and spring for the big, bold, juicy, deliciousness of Oaxaca colors — ripe mango, intense papaya, luscious pomegranate, limeade green, sweet melon, and tangy pink grapefruit.

At 8 a.m. on Sunday morning I found myself in the paint department of Lowe’s Home Store looking at samples. While the rest of the world was immersed in Super Bowl Sunday, I was atop an eight foot ladder with brush in hand making my own part of Oaxaca come alive in my North Carolina kitchen hallway.

Hot Mango Salsa Paint Job! Yummy.

P.S. I don’t think Valspar quite captured the essence of this color by naming it “Roasted Chestnut” (3002-3A).