Tag Archives: Mexico

No Alternative Facts. Send Paul Ryan a Message: Postcards From Oaxaca

I never intended this as a political blog. Far from it. It’s about art, culture, history centered in Oaxaca, Mexico. But, these are unusual times. After the Saturday march here on January 21, that some say 2,000 people attended, I don’t want to sit back. I want to keep the momentum going, as do so many of you, wherever you are. But, I’m in Oaxaca so this is about Oaxaca!

A simple homemade postcard sends a powerful message.

What Can We Do? Open the Floodgates!

I’m asking Oaxaca Expats and all people of civility to join with us to write Paul Ryan a postcard (address below). Tweet Paul Ryan at @SpeakerRyan (thanks, Mary Stellatello). Seems phone lines into his office are clogged. So, let’s find an #alternatepath for our voices to be heard. The messages are simple.  Use these or create your own:

  • Keep the Affordable Health Care Act (ACA)
  • Don’t tamper with Medicare — no privatization
  • Fund Planned Parenthood
  • Respect differences — do not legislate sexual choice
  • Keep our civil and human rights secure
  • Protect our environment, save our planet
  • Build community, not walls
  • Speak out against HR193 that repeals USA participation in the United Nations.

Here is my Facebook message today:

OK, #pussyhatnation There is no PAUSE. #noalternativefacts (notice the ALT). Only today counts. Today is #justthebeginning.

Since Paul Ryan has blocked his office phones and fax numbers, and is turning away people who show up to deliver petitions, time to change tactics.

Please mail post cards to his home address saying NO to defunding Planned Parenthood, NO to repealing the ACA, and NO to privatizing Medicare! (OR NO TO ANY CONGRESSIONAL ACTION YOU DISAGREE WITH)

PAUL RYAN
700 ST. LAWRENCE AVE.
Janesville, WI 53545

Twitter: @SpeakerRyan

Call to take the survey to #keeptheACA Please participate in Paul Ryan’s survey on the ACA (Obamacare). (202) 225-3031 (option 2), listen all the way to the end, and then press a number if you support the ACA and another if you do not. It takes a couple minutes. You can even leave him a message.

Simple words send loud and clear message to Congress

Roberta Christie and Norma Schafer (me) are collecting postcards addressed to Paul Ryan from Oaxaca expats. We will get them mailed to the USA. Contact us to make arrangements for postcard delivery/collection.

#keepthemomentumgoing #justthebeginning #NMP

You are our elected officials and serve all of us!

Women’s March Oaxaca: Just The Beginning!

One of the organizers told me the traffic police took a count and reported 2,000 people marching in Oaxaca, Mexico, on January 21. Whatever the number, it was an amazing demonstration of peaceful solidarity to support this worldwide movement.

Engage Oaxaca march organizers hold banner at front of march

The Andador Turistica — Macadonio Alcala — the cobblestone walking street lined with restaurants and tourist shops in the historic center of Oaxaca, was packed with people. They were expats and Oaxaqueños, Zapotecs, Canadians, Estadounidenses, visitors and permanent residents. We gathered together to say to the world, this newly installed president of the United States of America does not represent our values.

The signs say it all.

Click for a Compendium of Photos, News & Video at Engage Oaxaca!

The 45th President on a Oaxaca Wall.

The sentiment of the crowd felt serious yet celebratory. It was another gorgeous Oaxaca winter day with strong sun and a slight breeze as we started to gather in front of Santo Domingo Church for the 11 a.m. march. I could feel our energy, the exuberance welling as we channeled the frustration and anger we have felt in the last two months into positive action.

The is only the beginning, says Jen Psaki, Obama Staff

Mary Michal holds sign, In the entire world, no one is illegal.

I was not out in front. I trailed behind, one of the stragglers at the tail of the snake. As I stood at the peak of the Alcala at the corner of Abasolo/M. Bravo, where the street gently descends to the zocalo, the massive number of people took me off guard.

In solidarity with the people of Mexico!

When I met with some of the organizers on Wednesday morning, the prediction was for between 60 and 100 people. They would be happy with 100, they said!

Demonstrators pack the Alcala in Oaxaca, Mexico.

The message of this march is clear! We stand in solidarity with our Mexican friends and neighbors. We want a friendly relationship between governments. We do not support a wall. We stand firmly against the rhetoric of discrimination and xenophobia.

Photos, Women’s Marches Around the World

“I did not vote for Trumpistan.”

Mexicans marched with us. Mexicans stood on the sidewalks and took photos and video. Mexicans thanked me for participating and speaking out. People of good faith everywhere were joined together this day.

With the 16th century Santo Domingo Church behind us, we march.

“The March was a beautiful example of how a peaceful walk can inspire us – Canadians, Americans, Mexicans……… etc. We are all people and the somehow the underlying values will surface. Many thanks and I hope to be able to buy a v- neck shirt before we leave.” –Barbara Clough

Proud to be a Nasty Woman!

I thought of my son in Los Angeles, friends, people I do not know in every corner of the globe, especially those in Washington, D.C. on a gloomy, dreary day, making our voices heard for justice, free press, a clean environment, adequate health care coverage, equal, civil and human rights. The echo was resounding.

For the future of all our children, we march.

And, there is so much more do to. This is only the beginning. The momentum is with us. Do more than you ever thought possible. I will.

Human rights across race and gender.

When the march ended at the steps of the Metropolitan Cathedral about 40 minutes after it began, no one wanted to separate. We were an organic mass of purpose. Some climbed the few steps at the front of the cathedral and began to sing, We Shall Overcome. They sang several times more.

We had walked in silence. But we are not silent. We have a lot more to say.

I’m part of the PussyHat Nation, er … world.

Thank you to the dedicated team of organizers who formed Engage Oaxaca to create this:  Jacki Cooper Gordon, Roberta Christie, Shannon Pixley Sheppard, Nancy Clingan, Vicki Solot, Kathie McCleskey, Jess D’Great, and Erica Fox.

We will not be silenced, bullied or intimidated.

 

2017 Feria del Carrizo: Oaxaca’s Handwoven River Reed Basket Fair

Join the celebration in San Juan Guelavia

It’s that time of year again, the end of January and early February, when the river reed weavers of San Juan Guelavia hold their annual fair. The event, now in its sixth year, is more than a show and sale of great baskets.

January 29-February 5, 2017

It’s a food fest beyond imagination! You’ll find lots of tamales, chicken mole, goat barbecue, beer, artisanal mezcal, cookies and cakes there, too, to eat and enjoy. Everything is home made! Safe and clean to eat.

Need a guide? Use Sheri Brautigam’s Textile Fiestas of Mexico to take you there! I introduced Sheri to the Feria last year and she made it a chapter with photos.

Here is the weekly line-up.

Event Program, Feria del Carrizo, San Juan Guelavia

Past Oaxaca Cultural Navigator posts about the Feria del Carrizo. Delve into discussion and photos of baskets, people, food, culture, history.

 

Oaxaca Women’s Sister March: Taking a Stand for Mexico

We can’t stand by and do nothing, is the sentiment expressed by women around the world who are supporting the Women’s March on Washington, this Saturday, January 21. There are over 600 marches scheduled worldwide, including 15 in Mexico.

Oaxaca Sister March: In Solidarity with Mexicans

It’s the same here in Oaxaca, Mexico. We can’t stand by and do nothing.  Engage Oaxaca steering committee, the march organizers here, emphasize, too, that this is a solidarity march for Mexican human rights in the United States of America. It is in support of Mexico’s long-standing friendly relationships with the USA as a key trading partner. It is in protest of homophobic rhetoric that dominates the president-elect’s messages.

In the aftermath of the November 8 presidential election in the United States, seven women and one man got together in Oaxaca to commiserate. They didn’t all know each other. They are seasonal visitors or permanent residents who live here much or part of the year. They felt they had to do something.

They heard about plans for the Washington, DC march, and knew if they couldn’t be there, they needed to show support in Oaxaca.

At a meeting I attended yesterday, Vicki Solot, one of the steering committee members, says the group, which had grown to 20 people by this time, discussed whether it was legal for ex-pats to march in Mexico.

Jackie Cooper Gordon says they consulted with a Mexican lawyer who reassured them that if the issues had to do with United States policies and politics, and this was not an anti-Mexico demonstration, then it was constitutionally legal to hold the march.

Women’s March Oaxaca Flyer. Please forward!

Solot says that it’s important for everyone to know that Engage Oaxaca has permission from the Oaxaca Mayor’s Office and the Transit Police to march. The police will go with the marchers from Santo Domingo Church starting at 11 a.m. on Saturday, January 21. They will continue down the Andador walking street, Macedonio Alcala, to the Zocalo and disburse.

Roberta Christie, another steering committee member, says, “We are marching in solidarity with Mexican people. We live here in Mexico, we are U.S. citizens, and we don’t agree with his (U.S. president-elect) policies or escalating threats.”

Christie says the march gives us the opportunity to express our concern for the treatment of all immigrants in our country, and especially for Mexicans. “Local people I’ve talked to say this message is important,” she says. “We know Mexican people living in the U.S. who are fearful.” They are relatives of our friends here in Mexico.

Banner that Penny will march with in Washington, D.C.

When the committee first got together, Penelope Hand was there from Spokane, Washington. She said she would be in Washington, D.C. marching with friends on January 21. Penny will hold a banner representing Oaxaca ex-pats and friends.

So far, over 70 t-shirts emblazoned with Women’s March on Washington, Oaxaca, Mexico, have been sold. More will be available for sale just before the march begins. There’s no telling how many people will gather at Templo Santo Domingo on Saturday. March organizers say it may be between 60 and 100, maybe more.

Jacki Cooper Gordon is handling the t-shirt sale.

Where will you be, Saturday, January 21?

In Todos Santos, Mexico, Donna Schultz, a march organizer there, tells me that they will gather in the Town Plaza at 10 a.m. to stand together, men, women and children of all nationalities, who believe, “We have the right to protect our health, social, economic and educational rights.” She says that the focus is on women’s rights/human rights especially from the Mexican view-point. Local women will speak about progress being made in Todos Santos by women and for women that impacts the entire community. “We will sing together both in English and Spanish,” she adds.

Engage Oaxaca organized to create the march. Energy is building and there is more to do. They are discussing strategies to help more ex-pats vote in the next Congressional elections. They are starting an initiative to send postcards to House Speaker Paul Ryan’s home address in Wisconsin to voice concern over dismantling of the American Healthcare Act.

They will publish post-march photos on the website Engage Oaxaca and continue to hold meetings.

Through these actions, I’ve seen that being in warm, beautiful, sunny Oaxaca in winter months or year-round does not mean being isolated as a U.S. citizen from responsibilities to engage when cause merits it.

Why I March! #whyImarch

“I march because I cannot stay silent. I march because of my three young grandchildren and the world I hope is there for them. I march in support of my many Mexican friends who get up at 3:30 AM each day to work on Wisconsin dairy farms. I march because we only have one precious planet. I march because of my firm and profound belief that everyone, everywhere, is interconnected and we must stand up together in the face of fear, greed and intolerance.” — Mary Michal

“I believe in the power of the voice of the people. I have seen change come from it, right change. When I left the US after the election, I was concerned about not being present to share in that voice, in the march on 1/21 and other actions. It is imperative to me to speak out against the atrocities proposed and continued against women, Mexicans and other groups…. It is more important now to show solidarity with the Mexican people. It is important to let them know that most of us do not agree nor tolerate the notions of “el muro” and disrespect of Mexican people. We are here not only because of better economy and great weather, we love the Mexican people and culture. I am so glad to be marching in Oaxaca, in solidarity with the march all around the world, in peaceful defiance of the policies the new electorate stands for.” — Nancy Clingan

“As a permanent resident who has spent most of the last 12 years living in Oaxaca, I am marching to (1) protest the incoming president’s outrageous treatment of Mexico.  In words and promised policies he is waging economic war on this country and endangering the rights and the very lives of Mexicans in the U.S. (2) As a U.S. citizen, I am marching in solidarity with women in the U.S. and throughout the world. Only when women are equally represented in governance can we live in a more equitable and peaceful world. –Roberta Christie

“Why I march: To safeguard the gains we fought for and won in the past and to continue the struggle for a better future for my grandson and granddaughter-in-waiting.” — Shannon Pixley Sheppard

“I march to believe I will make a difference, that in the collective my one voice will rise with the many so a more positive world will unfold. I march to think of my grandparents and the generations before them who valued freedom of religion, a free press, an independent judiciary that protected minority rights, the equal rights of all people regardless of race, color or creed, that no human being is innately better or more deserving than another. I march because I have a responsibility to my country, to uphold the laws of the constitution that protect the individual. I march for women everywhere who are disenfranchised, enslaved, abused, controlled, belittled, seen as objects. I march because I love my family and friends and know that we deserve a just government, that the will of the people, the majority, will prevail.” — Norma Schafer

Add Your Voice! WHY DO YOU MARCH?

Oaxaca Love Story: Carol and David Get Married

On Thursday, January 12, at the bench in Labastida Park where they first met a bit more than two years ago, Carol Lynne Estes and David Levin got married.

Carol Lynne Estes and David Levin at Parque Labastida

It was one of those gorgeous late afternoon Oaxaca winter days punctuated with clear skies, bright sunshine, passersby on bicycles, street vendors hawking fresh roasted corn-on-the-cob, a group of salsa dancers in the adjacent space waiting for their teacher, school children with noses in open books, mothers towing recalcitrant children.

We gathered to witness and give support to a great couple!

As we gathered, Gail Schacter, a Victoria, B.C. snowbird, retold the story about how she introduced Carol and David. Seems that she and Carol had gone shopping to replenish incense sticks from the ceramics shop inside Plaza de las Virgenes. As they exited onto the street, Gail spotted David, who she knew, across the park on a bench eating a sandwich after his gym workout. They went to say hello. The rest, as they say, is history/herstory.

Oaxaca is a place for convergences, new discoveries, exploring identity, creating new beginnings. Living here has a way of opening us up to possibilities. It also stimulates us to see what we are capable of doing, being, becoming. This is not a new-age concept, but one more of what it means for some of us to live life more passionately, fully and in support of each other’s choices.

It is more than escaping the chilly north for a patch of winter sun and clear blue sky. Young and older gravitate here for so much more.

From the moment that Carol and David met, they were inseparable. Carol’s girlfriends had to get used to that! We quickly learned that this was a couple who stuck together, so an invitation to one was an invitation to both. Their devotion to each other, I think, expanded our capacity for friendship, inclusion and intimacy.

The park bench where it all began! Felicidades.

Some of us wondered about this unlikely couple, a Texas English teacher and a South African Jew who settled in Canada after university study there. Theirs is a model for respecting traditions and differences.

Carol, Gail and David remember introductions

In 2015, Carol and David traveled together throughout Asia for several months, learning to negotiate everything. And, it seems, they managed this pretty well. They didn’t kill each other! They returned to Oaxaca even more committed to their relationship and started planning their next adventure.

Mary and Carol, celebration time.

Life takes us in unpredictable directions. On a stopover in Toronto to visit family last summer before going on to India, David had a medical set-back. Now, with great Canadian health care, he is recovering well, but they need to be in Toronto until the treatment plan is complete.

Amidst the hubbub of a public park, a wedding!

David and Carol are making Toronto home for the time being, but they came back to Oaxaca to get married at the park bench where they first met. Oaxaca is their heart home. We gathered round in tribute to their love, commitment and testimony to all that Oaxaca can provide for each of us in different ways.

May your cup over-floweth–with mezcal, of course.

In Spanish: Saludos. In Zapoteco: Chichibayoh. In Hebrew: L’chaim. With Bob Klotz officiating and Mary Erickson standing as a matron of honor, we raised our cups of mezcal. What else would one drink at a Oaxaca wedding?

Divine lemon cake from La Pasion bakery in Colonia Reforma, tops off the event