Tag Archives: photography

Tlacolula Meanderings: Play, Parking Tickets and No Where In Particular

One of my favorite past-times is the Sunday Tlacolula market.  I never tire of it. There is always something new, different, another point-of-view. This week there were strange flowers that looked like lollipops, plus fuzzy rambutans for eating.

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Last Sunday, I parked on the street not attending to the “no parking” sign, which I didn’t think included the spot where I had stationed La Tuga.  Afterall, it was exactly where I parked the week before! Then, Carol and I set out to cover the market from one end to the other.  It was early and for the first block, we trailed a duo carrying guacalotes intended for sale.

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Then, there were the petate basket weavers from San Juan Guelavia who make traditional mats that gringos use for floor coverings who vend in the church courtyard along with the sellers of sal de gusano.

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The Tlacolula market is a food, flower and people fest. There’s no telling what you will find. Including a flower vendor with a floral skirt.

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After returning to find a parking ticket the size of a legal sheet of paper, I hailed a huge pick-up truck with flashing lights, two official policemen in the front seat, to ask where to go to pay it and how much it would cost, only to be greeted by the driver with, Do you speak English?” in perfect English.  I would follow this civil servant anywhere.

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And I did, winding around the streets of Tlacolula to get to the first hidden-away office, where several officials inspected me, ushered me into the inner sanctum, where the chief, a woman, stamped the ticket and told me to go to the regional finance office to pay. They are closed on Sunday, so I had to return during the week.

I did. The line was short. The ticket cost 255 pesos, about $21 USD, and I learned my lesson. Park in an official parking garage!

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On the day I paid the ticket, these guys were still cruising the street. Guess what? They waived. Me, too.

Oaxaca Faces: Photographs Up Close and Personal

Yesterday, Janet and I went to Cafe Brujula (the compass), a great little spot on Garcia Virgil that roasts its own beans. This before she went off to work in the morning, and I went out and about for a day filled with errands.  Some debate which is better, Cafe Brujula or Nuevo Mundo. You will have to come to Oaxaca and decide for yourself. Oaxaca shade-grown coffee, locally roasted, organic!

We were sitting at a shuttered window, open to the street talking and watching the passersby. The light was streaming into the dark space. The light on Janet’s face was so stunning that she consented to my request to photograph her. I told her she looked like a Zapotec queen.

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The shadows played tricks on me. But, nevertheless, these photos capture her beauty. She is wearing a vintage huipil from Chiapas that I brought back last year.

Last week, Natividad and her husband Arnulfo came to visit me at the casita with their two boys, Arnulfo and Rodolfo. The boys contented themselves by swinging in the hammock and running up and down the stairs to the upstairs terrace.  I have since gone shopping at the Tlacolula market to get wooden trucks for them to play with the next time they come over.

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A lot of what I’ve learned about taking portraits (and I still have a lot more to learn) is because of Matt Nager.  Matt is the instructor for our upcoming Portrait Photography Workshop Tour set to start the end of January 2015.  If your interest is in having a memorable travel experience that includes photography instruction, then come along!  All levels with any type of camera are welcome.

And, don’t forget Day of the Dead Photography Workshop Tour that starts October 27, 2014.  Still spaces open.

 

 

Rain Torrents and New Priest in Teotitlan del Valle, Oaxaca

The heavens opened yesterday afternoon to welcome a new priest to Teotitlan del Valle, Oaxaca. Perhaps, the ancient Zapotecs, in their infinite wisdom, said a special prayer for the rain god, too.  It is corn-planting season.

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The torrents came just as the celebration was to begin in the church courtyard, starting with a procession of young girls, soon-to-be women, with symbolic religious baskets to carry atop their heads. Needless to say, everyone ran for cover and the procession start was delayed. It rained about eight inches in less than an hour and a flood ensued

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This is a very special occasion.  Very.  It has been decades, perhaps longer than most can remember here, even the grandmothers, that a Catholic priest has been assigned to perform permanent, regular service for the village.  The regional religious center for the area is in the neighboring village of Tlacochahuaya, and one circuit priest has served many villages in the valley, scheduling religious rites according to who needs what, when.

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Everyone in Teotitlan del Valle is ecstatic.  In honor of this event, there is a mass this morning (Saturday) followed by tamales for everyone. I’m told the village expects more than 3,000 people in the church courtyard this afternoon.

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As is customary, the occasion will be marked by Los Danzantes, the famed group of young men who make a three-year church commitment to serve God through performing the Dance of the Feather whenever the volunteer church committee calls on them.

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For the girls, this, too, is a special occasion. For some of them, it will be the first time they will have participated in a desfile and it means a lot. They wear colorful hand-embroidered blouses, traditional woven wool wrap skirts usually dyed with cochineal and tied with a wool sash adorned with pom poms.  This is what the grandmothers wear every day. But times are changing and the dress is worn only for ceremonial purposes by the younger generations.

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In the photograph directly above, you can see the girls gathered, with the heavy canastas or baskets resting on the ground.  They are waiting for the procession to begin.  To the right, on the pillar of the inner courtyard of the church, is a Zapotec stone carving taken from the temple on the site and embedded into the church wall by the Spanish to attract the locals to the new religion.

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The rites of passage in Mexico has been an important part of indigenous culture for centuries.  The roots of these celebrations pre-date the conquest and one can imagine what it may have been like during the time of the Aztecs, Zapotecs and Mixtecs at the height of their civilizations by being here now.

That’s why it’s so meaningful to participate as a visitor. Please consider:

 

Mexico City in Summer Rain

Each afternoon this time of year, around four or five o’clock, the rains start.  They can last about thirty minutes, sometimes even an hour or more, and are occasionally accompanied by thunderstorms. People here are prepared. They carry umbrellas.  MexCityRain2014-7

Or, they have a late lunch-early dinner, as is the custom, and hang out in a favored restaurant or cafe until it all passes and cools everything off. It’s usually so beautiful and fresh in the morning that I forget to tote my own paragua and then find myself tiptoeing through raindrops or seeking shelter under an awning when the rains come.

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It’s impossible to find a taxi libre — one that is free and not filled with families, not prepared like me!

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Why not get on the bus? Join us for Day of the Dead Photography Workshop Tour starting October 27.

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PR Web Features 2014 Day of the Dead Photography Workshop Tour

Michael Stone, senior strategist at Novom Marketing Inc., a California-based travel and leisure marketing and public relations company serving a worldwide client-base, is working with me to feature the upcoming Day of the Dead Photography Workshop Tour.

READ ABOUT WHAT THEY SAY HERE!

Oaxaca Cultural Navigator LLC Hosts Day of the Dead Photography Workshop Tour Set for October 27-November 4, 2014 in Oaxaca, Mexico (via PRWeb)

Led by Photographer Frank Hunter, Workshop Open to All Levels, Beginner to Aspiring Professional Day of the Dead Photography Workshop Tour. The workshop tour is led by internationally known and exhibited photographer-teacher Frank Hunter whose work is…

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