Tag Archives: Virgin of Guadalupe

Dance of the Feather Tribute to the Virgin of Guadalupe, Teotitlan del Valle, Oaxaca

Teotitlan del Valle‘s Los Danzantes are famous throughout the Valles Centrales de Oaxaca. They make a commitment to the church four years before they actually begin their three-year term to perform La Danza de la Pluma — The Dance of the Feather — at all village festivals.

The Moctezuma flanked by Doña Marina and La Malinche, Mexico’s dualities

Honoring the Virgin of Guadalupe, Queen of Mexico, on December 12 and the days leading up to it, is an important part of their agreement.

Symbols of Our Lady the Virgin of Guadalupe on Dancer’s shield

On December 12, the Virgin’s Feast Day, the Dancers gathered in the church courtyard at around noon and continued with intermittent breaks until 8:00 p.m., when they went to the house of the Mayordomo Fidel Cruz for respite and supper.

Entering the festive church courtyard to watch the Dancers

These celebrations are important on many levels. They continue long-standing traditions, many of which pre-date the Spanish conquest.

Los Danzantes in the late afternoon shadows

They reinforce community, build cohesiveness among the young men and their families, they honor church and tradition, and they attract tourism — an essential part of this Zapotec rug-weaving village.

Dancers taking high leaps as shadows catch them

It is almost impossible to visit here for the first time without going home with a beautiful tapestry.

Inside the church, the altar honors Mexico’s Queen, La Reina de Mexico

The weaving culture is reflected in the dancers’ leggings and on the shields they wear. Many of them use pieces that were made by fathers and grandfathers twenty or more years ago.

Leggings are handwoven tapestry loomed wool in ancient Zapotec design

If you look closely, the weaving is fine, detailed and is a work of art.

Transluscent scarves float through afternoon light and shadow

As I stayed through the afternoon, I caught some of the long shadows as the sun set. After so many years of taking photographs of Los Danzantes leaping, shaking rattles, demonstrating their fortitude and strength, I was searching for a way to capture the scene in a different way.

Volunteer committee members pay respects

As the important village usos y costumbres committee members entered the church courtyard, many visitors, including me, moved to the periphery to give them seats of honor. As I moved around the circumference, I noticed how the shadows of the dancers became an extension of their bodies in the backlight of late afternoon.

Grandmother and grandson watching. The young ones dream of becoming dancers.

A spectacular clear day, warm in sun, chilly in shade

The band is an essential part of every fiesta

Children play atop the courtyard cross.

The Oaxaca Lending Library brought a group to watch. All visitors welcome!

Guadalupe atop canastas (baskets) for the December 10 parade

Side door entry to church from interior courtyard

A new altar adorns a niche under renovation inside church

If you visit, please make a donation for renovations

Folded chairs waiting for occupants, inside courtyard

Canastas waiting for return to storage, until the next time

Playing with shadows, Teotitlan del Valle, Oaxaca, Mexico


Queen of Mexico: Celebrating the Virgin of Guadalupe in Teotitlan del Valle

The three-day celebration in Teotitlan del Valle, Oaxaca, Mexico, leading up to December 12 to honor Mexico’s favorite saint, the Virgin of Guadalupe, started on December 10 with a 5 p.m. calenda (procession) that began in the church courtyard.

Parade of the Canastas winds through village streets for three miles

But, I arrived early, at 1 p..m., to find a couple celebrating a wedding in the church, followed by a group of cyclists from Teotitlan who arrived at 2 p.m. at the end of their journey from Juquila. They had pedaled 36-hours in a caravan complete with altar and bicycle repair sag wagon.

Bikes parked in church courtyard while cyclists receive blessings inside

A photo diary of the afternoon:

Celebrants holding fragrant poleo, part of the calenda ritual

You need to understand that in the hierarchy of religious symbols, the Virgin of Guadalupe is at the top. She is the embodiment of the pre-Hispanic corn goddess melded with the Virgin Mary by the conquerers. She is mother earth, goddess of nature and symbolic of life and the empowerment of women. God and Jesus are next in line. It’s what we call syncretism here.

Cousins Maya and Alicia were among the hundreds of young women chosen

Men volunteer to accompany, carry the bamboo baskets for relief

Onlookers at street corners take photos, applaud, acculturate children

And the band plays on, actually two of them!, accompanying Los Danzantes

At intervals, Dance of the Feather participants stop with a dance

Grandma Juana, Baby Luz, and Mama Edith along the way

Little girls are acculturated early to the importance of community ritual and tradition

This serape is old, woven in the 1960’s I was told

The young women started out at the homes of the Mayordomos, Fidel Cruz and Bulmaro Perez, who both live on the main entry road to the village, almost to the main highway, MEXICO 190 (Panamerican Highway). At the end of the night, they were tired. Mayordomo definition: The chief sponsor, organizer and funder of an major village event.

Yes, these baskets are very heavy. They walked at least five miles.

Watching from the second story along the parade route.

Ixcel Guadalupe gets ready to start the calenda from the church courtyard.

This dancer’s protective shield was hand-woven by his father years ago

After all had assembled in the church courtyard, the procession began: first the children holding papier-mache stanchions of turkeys, ducks, chickens, and dogs. Then came the chief of the fireworks, sending spiraling smoke bombs into the air, then Secundino (age 90+) playing the traditional Zapotec flute.

Barbara, David and Jo Ann came from California and New Mexico

He was followed by the Danzantes (Dance of the Feather participants), then the young maidens in traditional dress holding elaborate, heavy baskets on their heads.

All ages enjoy the pageantry

Since there were two mayordomos, there were two bands and two groups of young women, sponsored by each. It was quite a spectacle.

The calenda: firecrackers, music, giant balloons, children with duck, turkey flags

I decided to follow and the pace was easy enough that I found myself often midway or at the front of the group — until I recognized village friends, stopped to chat, and got left behind, only to dash to catch up again. The three miles went quickly.

The Virgin of Guadalupe, Queen of Mexico

Dance of the Feather group with Moctezuma, La Malinche and Doña Marina

At the end, I joined Barbara, David, J0 Ann and Beverly for a quiet dinner of homemade memelas, yogurt jello, atole, and fruit provided by  host Bulmaro Perez and family. I brought the cuishe mezcal!

Assembly in the church courtyard at the end of the calenda, at dusk.

Tonight, Monday, the fireworks start at 9 p.m. The last fireworks I attended announced for 9 p.m. got going around 11 p.m.

I’m not sure I can stay up that late!

I took the dogs on a long, three-mile walk out to the border of our neighboring village, and I’m not very energetic.

Today’s walk in the campo, with a new discovery: swimming hole

Tomorrow, Tuesday, December 12, the Dance of the Feather begins in the church courtyard, they say at noon and will go until 8 p.m. or 9 p.m. followed by another calenda of the church committee.

Leaping Danzantes. They get off their feet.

The Juquila bicyclists’ sag wagon

Long live the Queen of Mexico, Virgin of Guadalupe


Celebrating the Virgin of Guadalupe in Teotitlan del Valle, Oaxaca: Schedule

From the looks of this poster, most of the festivities celebrating the Virgin of Guadalupe — La Virgen de Guadalupe — in Teotitlan del Valle, will happen on Sunday, December 10, 2017 and Monday, December 11, 2017.

For those of you planning to be here on December 12, to celebrate Mexico’s most important saint, you may be disappointed! Not much is happening by then unless you want to attend the church mass.

Complete schedule for Teotitlan’s Virgin of Guadalupe Celebration

I know this poster is hard to read. So, here is the cut-and-paste I did for Sunday, December 10, schedule. 

Sunday, December 10, schedule

At 3 p.m. on Sunday, the celebration continues with young women of the village dressed in traditional clothing and canastas (baskets) filled with flowers, who gather in the church courtyard with the Dance of the Feather dancers.

At 4 p.m. begins the Calenda (parade) along the main streets of the village, accompanied by the band.

At 7 p.m. they arrive at the house of the First Mayordomo C. Fidel Cruz Lazo.

The schedule for Monday, December 11, 2017 is …

Monday, December 11, schedule, Teotitlan del Valle

Looks like Monday, is the big day. At 2 p.m. there is a celebration of mass with vespers. Then, at 7 p.m. will be the calendas followed by a castle of fireworks at 8 p.m.

Hope to see you at the Calenda!

The Mayordomos and Committees who make the celebration possible!

The Mayordomos and Committees

The Virgin of Guadalupe: Goddess of the People

The Virgin of Guadalupe, the embodiment of the Virgin Mary, appeared to an indigenous Mexican ten years after the conquest in 1531.  Juan Diego, his baptized name, told the bishop that the Virgin asked that a temple be built in her honor.  The  bishop asked for a sign of proof and Juan Diego returned with roses, until then unknown in Mexico, and his cloak transformed into the image we know today.  The cloth below is believed to be Juan Diego’s cloak.

During our too brief stop at the Basilica of Guadalupe (more than an hour is needed to do the site justice), I was struck by how The Virgin of Guadalupe is really the People’s Goddess.  We were here on a pilgrimage day.  Indigenous people in native dress came from all parts of Mexico and gathered in the new basilica.  Those that didn’t fit spilled out onto the huge plaza that can accommodate 50,000 people.   They carried baby Jesus figures to be blessed by the priest in preparation for Christmas.  They held images of the Virgin, wore flowered hats, carried standards and placards, sat quietly in spiritual reflection embracing the crucifix.

The Aztecs venerated Mother Earth, known as Tonantzin or Xochiquetzal.  This basilica is built atop an Aztec temple to honor Mother Earth.  The Virgin of Guadalupe is considered to be the first Mexican symbol that syncretized the Aztec and Catholic religious systems.

In 1531, the Spanish Inquisition was raging in Mexico.  Those who did not embrace the new religion were in peril of losing their lives.  By accepting the Virgin of Guadalupe, which successfully blends the Virgin Mary with Mother Earth, indigenous people ensured that they could embrace Catholicism without sacrificing their native traditions and practices.  Perhaps Juan Diego was an insightful philosopher who understood what needed to be done for cultural preservation.  Today Guadalupanismo has become a faith that many consider to be stronger than the Catholic church in Mexico.


The armies of Miguel Hidalgo took the image of the Virgin of Guadalupe for the Mexican indigenous peasants to embrace with the cry for independence.

The portrait of the Virgin of Guadalupe is rife with symbolism.  She wears a cloak that evokes the moon, the symbol of fertility, and includes a flower with four petals on her belly that represent the four cardinal points.  The folds of the cloak show she is pregnant.  Other symbols in the painting incorporate ancient pre-Hispanic traditions which you can read about by clicking the link above.

The Basilica is the second most visited Catholic site outside the Vatican.  Over seven million people visit during Christmas week.  I wish I had more time there  to experience the prayerful reverence of the people.  Next time!


You may know that Mexico City is sinking.  It is built atop landfill that covers a lake bed.  The 1706 Basilica is sinking and leaning, though it is undergoing reclamation.  The new Basilica, built in 1976, is supposedly sink-proof!


Come with us on a Street Photography adventure in January 2013.