Tag Archives: huipiles

Mother’s Day Tidbits + New in the Shop

Mother’s Day, started by social activist Anna Jarvis in the early 20th century to honor her own mother, has now become the second most popular holiday in the United States for gift-giving, following Christmas. Groups of mothers whose sons had fought or died on opposite sides of the American Civil War were involved in the early development of the holiday.  Jarvis’ mother was a peace activist who wanted to improve the lives of other mothers. In 1914, President Woodrow Wilson officially made Mother’s Day a national holiday. In 1918, the fledgling Florists Telegraph Delivery group (FTD) began promoting Say it With Flowers, for their Mother’s Day Campaign. They could not keep white carnations, the official Mother’s Day flower, in stock. Hallmark began creating and producing Mother’s Day cards in the early 1920’s. Gift-giving became a central part of Mother’s Day, too, since its inception.

Mother’s Day is always the second Sunday in May. We have clothing, home goods, jewelry, and rugs in the shop to tickle any mother’s fancy. In fact, you don’t have to be a mother to participate in this celebration. All women deserve to be recognized for our accomplishments and attributes, whether we are married, single, with or without children, or who use another pronoun to distinguish themselves!

We will get anything you choose into the mail ASAP. Just say to your favorite recipient: We are gifting you with something special from Oaxaca Cultural Navigator and it will be arriving soon! And, remember, use your credit card or PayPal — no fees to you when you purchase from the shop.

www.shop.oaxacaculture.com

Just listed, French knot blouses made by Francisca in Amatenango del Valle, Chiapas. Every stitch is impeccably made by hand — there is not one bit of machine stitching in this garment!

Below is an exceptional, rare huipil from Pueblo Mixteco de la Costa. It is difficult to find a back-strap loom woven garment in this village now. It is discontinuous weft, also known as supplementary weft or pick-up weaving. The base cloth is cotton and the intricate designs are woven with synthetic thread.

New Shipment Arrived for Shop Oaxaca Culture: Shop Mother’s Day

Three more very large shipping boxes just arrived from Oaxaca and we’ve just listed their contents on the shop! We are featuring handwoven and densely embroidered huipiles and blusas, rebozos, neck ties and bandanas, handwoven palm baskets, beaded coin purses, and more. These are from the Oaxaca Coast, Chiapas, the Mixteca Alta, and Michoacan.

There are now 81 articles of clothing, 37 items in the home goods section, 13 handwoven wool tapestry rugs, a pair of handwoven cotton draperies, and 19 lovely pieces of jewelry in the shop — over 150 items to choose from. The shop is growing and we sell out quickly, so we hope you will take a look and make your choices. We are happy to combine shipments when we can.

Please measure carefully. All purchases are non-refundable and not-returnable.

www.shop.oaxacaculture.com

Use your credit card or PayPal to purchase. No fees to you! Here are a few of the new items in the shop, many are perfect for spring and summer dressing, comfortable, lightweight linen and cotton. We hope you take a moment to browse the collection.

Rare: Purple Snail Dye, Indigo Clothing Sale from Oaxaca

Monica contacted me this week and asked for help to sell her hand-woven, naturally dyed cotton huipiles and blusas. She is from the Oaxaca coast village of Pinotepa de Don Luis and is married to Rafael Avedaño, the son of the famed purple snail dyer Don Habacuc Avedaño. Rafa learned how to milk the purple snail from his father, extracting the dye and then putting the snail back into the water to regenerate. They dye the hand-spun native white cotton right there on the rocks along the tide pools near Huatulco. Monica is a master weaver and creates stunning, well made and airy garments perfect for the heat and humidity along the coast. Yes, it’s even hot there in January — the coolest month.

P.S. We still have one space open in our January 2024 Oaxaca Coast Textile Study Tour.

There are still many days left in summer and it’s likely that this heat we are experiencing will not let up for quite some time. A perfect time to adorn yourself in something hand made, sustainable, and elegant. These clothes are easy-to-wash-and-wear, and will allow your body to breathe while still looking fresh. Each one is one-of-a-kind! You know you are supporting a Oaxaca weaver directly when you purchase.

Here’s how it works: Monica sent me photos that I am posting here with dimensions and prices. Please order by August 12, 2023. You will pre-pay and I will add on $20 mailing cost. If you order more than one piece, I will combine mailing. Monica will then send me a package of all to take to the post office.

How to Buy: mailto:norma.schafer@icloud.com Tell me the item you want by number. Send me your mailing address. Tell me how you want to pay and include your account name, email or phone number. Choose one of three ways.

You can pay one of three ways: 1) with Zelle (no service fee; 2) with Venmo or 3) with PayPal (3.5% service fee for either one). We will send a Request for Funds (tell us how your account is registered). The request will include the cost of the garment + $17 mailing. If you want more than one piece, I’m happy to combine mailing.

Please measure carefully. We are unable to accept returns since we will have already paid the artisans. Width is measured across the front. Length is measured from shoulder to hem. Thank you!

Meaningful Gifts That Support Oaxaca Artisans

This is a preview of what will be our last sale before the holidays. If you love Oaxaca and are keeping track of Covid-19 there, you know that the CDC has urged us to NOT travel there. All the social media groups I belong to warn of the same: Covid-19 is raging, hospitals are full and it is dangerous to go. In the absence of tourism, artisans are struggling. You can help by making a purchase here to directly support them.

Assortment of Las Sanjuaneras blusas and huipiles–15 pieces total

I have just received a small shipment of textiles from Las Sanjuaneras Cooperative in the remote coastal village of San Juan Colorado. These pieces will go up for sale on Sunday. Shop will open at 1 PM Eastern Time on Sunday, December 6, 2020.

Maria and her niece, Aguacatenango, Chiapas

I am also expecting a limited shipment of embroidered French knot blouses from Chiapas later next week. Most will be in large and extra-large sizes.

French knots galore–embroidery from Chiapas

Also coming from Oaxaca are a few hand-woven naturally dyed tapestry rugs from Taller Teñido a Mano, along with lengths of naturally-dyed cotton that we will sell as yardage for sewists.

Indigo-dyed wool rug, Teotitlan del Valle

I work directly with the artisans so they get full value for their work. You can be assured that as soon as you buy, I send funds directly to them via Western Union that they can pick up as cash. I also use Remitly that deposits into bank accounts, if they have one.

Indigo-dyed cotton, 12-1/2″x22″ by Taller Teñido a Mano

You get something beautiful to wear or to gift. The artisan has an income to buy the necessities of life at this moment!

Cochineal dyed cotton, 12×22, Taller Teñido a Mano

What do we call them? Huipiles. Not Caftans!

In addition to cultural appropriation, there is a debate raging about what to call the hand-woven, back-strap loomed garments from Mexico that many of us know as huipiles. This is plural. The singular is huipil. (Some huipiles for sale below!)

How do you say it?

Whee-peel.

(or What do you do with a banana? We peel. — Thank you, Mary Randall)

Whee-peel-ess.

Caftan (kaftan) or tunic is a misnomer. I am reminded of this via a text message this morning from Ana Paula Fuentes, who introduced me to Las Sanjuaneras some years ago and was the founding director of the Museo Textil de Oaxaca. I promised her that you and I would have a discussion about Mexican clothing as a way to spread the word about culture.

I just want to set the record straight that I called these garments thus because it is what the American and Canadian marketplace knows and understands as a fashion definition. We’ve been acculturated since the 60’s when these garments came to us from Europe and North Africa and Asia as casual wear, beach and pool wear, loungewear. Now, with Covid-19, the idea is being reintroduced to the world of contemporary clothing as a perfect solution to comfort while we are homebound.

Let’s have the conversation: Clothing origins from Mexico deserve to be called by their true name. Huipil. Bluson. Blusa. Rebozo. Quechquemitl. Etc. And, we can spread the word about the quality of Mexico’s indigenous weaving by using the true name of the garment. People need to know these are huipiles. Not caftans or tunics.

Bluson: A short, cropped flowing version of a huipil, usually waist-length or hip-length.

Blusa: A blouse, more fitted than free-form; a universal term.

Rebozo: A shawl whose origins are from the Philippines via Spain.

Quechquemitl: A triangular pull-over shawl, scarf, cover-up that is pre-Hispanic and the first indigenous garment.

So, help us out here. When you wear one of these garments, call it a Huipil. Together, we can be influencers and talk about Mexico as being a fashion innovator rather than a follower of Euro-centric style. You give value to the weavers this way, too. Thank you.

Still some beauties from Las Sanjuaneras For Sale

#10. Andrea. Bluson. Marigold, chocolatillo. 35-1/2×24. $295.

To Buy: Please email me normahawthorne@mac.com with your name, mailing address and item number. I will mark it SOLD, send you a PayPal link to purchase and add $12 for cost of mailing. Please be sure to select Send Money to Family and Friends! We also accept Venmo and I can send you a Square invoice (+3% fee) if you don’t use PayPal.

#2. Camerina. Huipil. Indigo, iron oxide. $285. 34-1/2×34. $285.
#18. Aurora. 19×28. Blusa. Nanche, mahogany, almond, beet. $195.
SOLD. #16. Patrocinia. Bluson. Indigo, native cotton, $195.
#24. Aurora. Bluson. Beet, mahogany, nanche, almond, iron oxide. 38×22. $295.
SOLD. #7. Maria Lucia. 40×40. Huipil. Indigo, iron oxide, beet, nanche. $395
#20. Andrea. Blusa. Marigold, iron oxide, native cotton. 22-3/4×30. $195.
#21. Margarita. Blusa. Marigold, iron oxide, beet, brazilwood, 22-3/4×35. $165.