Monthly Archives: October 2021

Collector’s Textile Sale: Preview 3

It’s been 19 months since I’ve been to my home in Teotitlan del Valle, Oaxaca. In the past several years I’ve been walking, and eating for health (gluten and lactose free). Most of the handwoven clothes I have, mostly from Oaxaca and Chiapas, do not fit! If you wear a size Medium, Large or Extra Large, then look closely below for some beautiful
blouses (blusas) and dresses (huipiles). Many rare, most with natural dyes.

How to buy: Tell me the item you want by number. Send me your mailing address. I will send you a PayPal invoice after you ID your choices. The invoice will include the cost of the garment + $12 mailing. If you want more than once piece, I’m happy to combine mailing. I’ll be mailing from Taos, NM when I return after November 15.

SOLD. 3.0. From Rancho Grande in the Chinantla region of Oaxaca in the mountains between the city and Veracruz. An eye-popping huipil with embroidered flowers and butterflies, birds and bees. 27” wide x29” long. Sells for over $400 in Oaxaca. $165.
SOLD #3.1. This open cut work is called deshilado. Very difficult to achieve. 100% natural cotton. Simple and elegant. 28” wide x 29” Long. $68.
SOLD 3.2. Blusa from San Antonino Castillo Velasco near Ocotlan. Bodice is filled with embroidered birds and flowers. Truly remarkable work. 24” wide x25”long. $125.
SOLD. 3.3. From Remigio Mestas and Los Baules de Juana Cata in Oaxaca City. Handwoven on backstrap loom. Indigo and iron oxide natural dyes. A fine blusa from San Juan Cotzocon. 27” wide x 27” long. $145.
#3.4. Dimensions and description same as #3.5. $72.
#3.5. From Remegio Mestas and Los Baules de Juana Cata, the finest indigenous textile gallery in Oaxaca. Size large. Cotton with intricate smocking to make the deer bodice design. 23” wide across chest, 29” long. $72.
SOLD. 3.6. Chiapas top. Sturdy cotton woven on the backstrap loom. 31” wide x 35”long. Embroidered trim around neck, sleeves, hem. Great with jeans. $75.
#3.7. From Pinotepa de Don Luis, caracol púrpura purple sea snail dyed threads embroidered collar on backstrap loomed fabric. 28” wide x 29” long. $185.
SOLD. 3.8. Elaborately woven gala huipil, the fanciest and most detailed from the Amusgo village of Xochistlahuaca, Guerrero just across the Oaxaca border. This is a $700 garment. Takes a year to weave. Gauzy for hot weather. 33” wide x 35” long. $350.
#3.9. From Pinotepa Nacional, a detailed embroidered collar on white back strap loomed fabric. 25” wide x 29” long. $145.
SOLD. 3.10. Khadi Oaxaca natural dye blusa in wild marigold and indigo design in the supplementary weft. Design is woven and not embroidered. Comfy and like a poncho but closed side seams. 32” wide x25”long. $95.
#3.11. Dreamweavers cooperative in Pinotepa de Don Luis. Rare caracol púrpura purple snail dye and handspun fine white cotton. Subtle. Elegant. 29” wide x 32” long. $175.
SOLD. #3.12. An outstanding example of an Arte de Amusgo huipil from San Pedro Amusgo and Odilón Morales in indigo and native brown coyuchi cotton that is hand spun. Woven on the backstrap loom. 28” wide x 40” long. A true collector’s piece. Look at the exquisite detail of the bodice. A $1,200 garment. Yours for $495.

Day-by-Day: Remembering Juvenal Gutiérrez, Teotitlan del Valle

In a week we will observe Dia de los Muertos here. In the city, it’s a big party. Many foreign visitors will arrive to eat, drink mezcal and make a rowdy show of Muertos that has become more like Halloween here. In the USA, Halloween — or All Hallows’ Eve — is said to rival Christmas in the amount of money spent on decorations.

in Teotitlan where I live, the small Zapotec village of around 7,000 people, observations are more traditional in keeping with pre-Hispanic culture fused with indigenous roots. My culture tour group will start on October 28, and I’ll be posting as we go along.

Right now, it is chilly and there is a fine rain that required me to search my closet for a wool covering and a long sleeve blouse this morning.

Yesterday, I went to visit Norma Gutiérrez and her daughter Lisette. Husband and father Juvenal died from covid in San Diego earlier this year. He was young and strong. In Spanish (with some translation help from Lisette) we talked about the existential question of life and death: WHY?

is there an answer? I suppose this is why religion exists — to help us accept the inexplicable and to give us hope that we may reunite with a loved one who has departed this world. It’s a perfect lead in to Dia de los Muertos—a mystical tradition that reveres the dead and welcomes them (their) spirit back into our lives each year.

Muertos is a time to honor and remember Juvenal’s life along with so many others list to this virus. We build an altar that includes favorite foods, beverages and the aromas of chocolate a d wild marigold guide the dead back home where they come to life for a day.

Memory plays a critical role. As I sat with Norma and Lisette, I returned to the time I first met Juvenal 16 years ago, when I visited the English class he was teaching. I thought of my own mother and father and wished they were still with me. And, I acknowledged that they are — in spirit.

Norma is a baker and makes delicious organic cakes. I brought back almond flour for her from the US to make me one that is gluten free. It costs $17 for a bag of this flour here! She will be baking for our grand finale tour dinner.

There is no better way to help families as they recover from loss but to sit with them to share their pain, and to support them economically.

Collector’s Textile Sale Preview 2

Over the years, I have collected handmade garments made by very talented women (and some men) in remote villages I have visited throughout Mexico. As I age, my body has changed. I’ve lost both height and weight. It does me no good to have these in my closet and I’m not starting a museum! All are fairly priced to give you an opportunity to treasure these wonderful pieces I have curated. Many have never been worn. I purchased them to support the artisans. Thank you for looking and considering.

Buy now and I will mail around November 15 when I return to New Mexico. Tell me the item number you want and your mailing address. I will send you a PayPal invoice and add $12 for mailing.

To order, send me an email. http://mail to:norma.schafer@icloud.com

14 pieces at various prices. Check them out.

SOLD. 2.1. A full length, gorgeous Dreamweavers huipil, 26” wide x 46” long. Indigo and caracol púrpura. All handmade on the backstrap loom. $325.
SOLD. #2.2. Las Sanjuaneras gauze blusa woven on the backstrap loom. From San Juan Colorado, Oaxaca. Indigo and coconut shell natural dyes. A lovely summer coverup or wear over a long-sleev T in winter. 29” long x 36” wide. Very drapy. $95.
#2.3. From Aguacatenango, Chiapas. Finely embroidered with smocking. All handwork, including seams. 22” long x 22” wide. 100% cotton. Will fit size medium. $55.
#2.4. CHAKIRA MEANS BEADED. This densely beaded blouse is covered completely on the bodice. It has needle lace trim interspersed with tiny red beads that trim the neckline. Made in the mountains of Puebla state. These blouses have sold in Santa Fe on the Plaza for $450. Yours for $200. Measures 22” wide x 27” long.
#2.5. Very nice embroidery on traditional Mexican dress. 100% cotton. 22” wide x 46” long. $55
#2.6. All natural dyes in this huipil woven on the Oaxaca coast by Jini Nuu Cooperative in San Juan Colorado It includes homegrown native Oaxaca cotton that is pre-Hispanic. $160. 27” wide x 45” long.
SOLD. 2.7. Two-tone indigo poncho embellished with double-headed eagles adorn this custom designed Egyptian cotton poncho from Remegio Mestas’ Los Baules de Juana Cata, Oaxaca. Soft, cozy, drapy. Open on the side. The best quality anywhere. Backstrap loomed. Rare. $275. 33” long x 40” wide.
#2.8. From the Papaloapan region of Oaxaca, between the city and Veracruz, in the Sierra Madre del Sur, this stunning dress is densely embroidered representing the region’s birds and flowers. Cotton. $170. 29” wide x 48” long.
#2.9. Like wearing a stained glass window, this is a traditional gala huipil from the Chinantla region of Oaxaca. Motifs feature The Tree of Life. I bought this directly from the maker. $255. (A steal. These sell for $600-700). Measures 28” wide x 40 long.
SOLD. #2.10. Elegant white on white huipil woven on the backstrap loom with fine cotton from the Amusgo region of Oaxaca along the Pacific coast. From one of the best women’s cooperatives. $395. 29” wide x 44” long.
#2.11. From Jamiltepec on the Oaxaca coast, a lively blusa that is both backstrap loomed and embroidered. Measures 24” wide and 24” long. $65.
SOLD. #2.12. I searched far and wide for the best example of a machine embroidered blouse from Tlahuitoltepec, Oaxaca. Here it is! Note: this is free-form, hand-guided embroidery—so it is really made by hand! With 3/4 length sleeves and amazing detail in the traditional colors. Sturdy 100% cotton. Measures 21” wide x 27” long. $72.
SOLD. 2.13. Natural dye 100% cotton ruana (modified poncho — closed in back, open in front) from the San Juan Colorado Cooperative Jini Nuu. Uses wild marigold and pomegranate for the dyes. Hand tied fringes. 24” wide x 28” long. One size fits most. $65.
SOLD. 2.14. Cotton warp and wool weft dyed with indigo and wild marigold distinguish this shawl woven by Arturo Hernández in Mitla. Cozy, warm. Measures 18” wide x 66” long. Hand tied fringes. $65.

Collector’s Textile Sale Preview

SOLD. #1. Pinotepa de Do. Luis, Oaxaca coast. Índigo and snail Dye Blusa, backstrap loom, size Medium-Large, $250

It’s been 19 months since I’ve been to my home in Teotitlan del Valle, Oaxaca. In the past several years I’ve been walking, eating for healthfully (gluten and lactose free. Most of the Oaxaca and Chiapas made clothes from my beautiful collection do not fit! I’ve gone from size large or medium to small/extra small.

In the weeks to come, I will be posting these for sale. Buy them now and I will bring them back to the US and mail them to you when I return on November 15 — just in time for Thanksgiving and Christmas.

I’m posting a preview of some of these here today. There are many more. So, please look for future postings!

How to buy: Tell me the item you want by number. Send me your mailing address. I will send you a PayPal invoice after you ID your choices. The invoice will include the cost of the garment + $12 mailing. I’ll be mailing from Taos, NM when I return.

Many thanks,

Norma

#2. Size Large. Pinotepa de Don Luis Dreamweavers huipil with natural cotton and snail dye caracol púrpura. Backstrap loom. $195.
#3. Quechquemitl poncho from San Cristobal de las Casas, Chiapas. Backstrap loom. One size fits most. $68.
SOLD. #4. Blouse from San Andres Larrainzar, Chiapas, backstrap loomed. Size large. Later over long-sleeve T for cooler weather. $75.
#5. Blusa from Magdalena Aldama, Chiapas. Backstrap loomed bodice. Commercial base fabric. Size Medium. $85.
SOLD. #6. Gorgeous, festive embroidered blouse from Chiapas. Lacy base fabric. Intricate detail. Size M-L. $85.
#7. Quechquemitl-poncho. Cotton with embroidered detail. Backstrap loomed. One size fits most. $25.
#8. From Tlahuitoltepec, Oaxaca, designer linen lo g sleeve blouse with machine embroidery. Longer panel in back to cover tush. Size Medium. $95.

More to come in the next days. Thanks for considering!

Masks Up Oaxaca

I’ve arrived. And I’m astounded at the safety precautions in Oaxaca city. I spent Friday in the city. First, I met Carol for brunch at El Tendajon at the corner of Calle Constitución and Pino Suarez. You can’t just walk in! There’s a gate. They check your temperature and ask you to use Ha d da itinerary before entering. Every staff member is properly masked.

i walked there from the La Noria neighborhood, a good mile and-a-half. Along the way, I’d say 1 in 50 were unmasked. Better than the US I think. This is outdoors, on the sidewalks, with a breeze!

Translate from Fahrenheit to Celsius

After brunch, Carol and I went to the stamp museum at the corner of Reforma and Constitución. No entry without a temperature reading there, either. Hand sanitizer mandatory. The thermometer was some kind of fancy technology gizmo that takes a reading from your wrist.

How safe did I feel? Completely safe. Quite a relief after the frenzy of air travel.

Bread vendor in the market

Now, I’m in my little house in the campo in Teotitlan del Valle. The sun is shining and I’ve just gotten back from a walk with the dogs. Yes, they remembered me even though I’ve been gone for 19 months. It’s supposed to rain. Everything here is lush and green.
Im

I am sure the farmers are happy.

On my walk in the village

This morning I went to the village market to buy chicken and vegetables for a Caldo de Pollo. Mask up. Hand sanitizer at the ready. Here, about 1 in 20 are wearing masks. I asked my chicken lady why she didn’t have one. I don’t believe it, she said. Another woman I know said God will protect me. I’m not sure it’s much different here than in Oklahoma or Florida. Although Natividad told me that the majority of the people in the village are vaccinated. So that is reassuring.

We hear that indigenous people have deep suspicions of government, especially the older ones who have suffered discrimination. Even so, I used my hand sanitizer frequently and disinfected the veggies and fruit when I got home, just like I always did.

My host Federico said the virus and Delta variant is waning here, so people are not as afraid as they were before. And, so it goes.

With my mask up, and three vaccines under my belt, I’m not feeling as vulnerable and I can monitor my social distancing and step away as needed.

Butch and Tia in the campo. Federico renamed them Chiquita and Viejo!

The elevation here is 5,000 feet, quite a bit less than Taos. With my doggy companions, Tia and Butch, I kept up a good pace going through the agave and corn fields. I’m noticing that more fields are planted with mezcal-producing agave, a cash crop that is bringing high market prices at maturity (seven years for espadín).

My friends Natividad and Arnulfo, with Esmeralda and Rodolfo

For those coming with me and Eric Chávez Santiago for our Day of the Dead Tour, I know you will love being here, just as I am.