Tag Archives: clothing

Happy Black Friday Frenzy Sale

We are jumping into the Black Friday holiday sale fray and offering you a few choice pieces from our collection with deep discounts. Scroll all the way down–16 pieces today. I don’t know about you, but I gained three pounds after our Thanksgiving food extravaganza. Maybe online shopping will burn calories!

See these recent listings, too!

How to Buy: Send an email to norma.schafer@icloud.com and tell me the item(s) you want to purchase by number, your email, your mailing address and which payment method you prefer: 1) Zelle bank transfer with no service fee; 2) Venmo or 3) PayPal each with a 3% service fee. I will send you a request for funds and then add on a flat rate $14 mailing fee. Happy to combine shipping if you buy more than one piece. These are one-of-a-kind. Note: Thank you for understanding that all sales are final. Please measure carefully.

Deals Continued From Oaxaca, Chiapas + More

We are committed to supporting Mexican artisans, especially women who work so hard to support their families to give them schooling, health care and nutritious food. Food insecurity is a big deal in remote villages. Access to local medical clinics is severely limited. There are extra costs for school books, tuition and required uniforms. It’s the women who, through their weaving, are able to earn extra income to supplement the basics that the men can provide through subsistence farming. That’s why your support is so important. Big thanks as we approach Thanksgiving, for all you have done and continue to do to enable Oaxaca Cultural Navigator to buy direct and outright from the makers, and not on consignment.

I’m returning to Oaxaca at the end of December and want to clear my inventory of many beautiful pieces before then. What better time than NOW to add some splash to your holiday dressing with these Pre- and Post-Thanksgiving Specials. We have some home goods, too. Many pieces deeply discounted. I’m listing 12 things here, with more to come.

How to Buy: Send an email to norma.schafer@icloud.com and tell me the item(s) you want to purchase by number, your email, your mailing address and which payment method you prefer: 1) Zelle bank transfer with no service fee; 2) Venmo or 3) PayPal each with a 3% service fee. I will send you a request for funds and then add on a flat rate $14 mailing fee. Happy to combine shipping if you buy more than one piece. These are one-of-a-kind. Note: Thank you for understanding that all sales are final. Please measure carefully.

See our Deeply Discounted Designer Baskets, too.

#1. Steel Grey Floral Blouse from Zinacantan, Chiapas, land of the flower greenhouses! This is a village in the highlands just beyond San Cristobal de Las Casas where elaborate floral embroidery decorates everything. Machine washable, cold water, gentle cycle. Hang to dry. 23″ wide x 29″ long. Wear out or tuck into pants or a skirt. Shimmering beauty. Was $85. Now $65.

SOLD. #2. Gunmetal Grey Floral Blouse from Zinacantan, Chiapas, land of the flower greenhouses! Great contrast between blouse fabric and embroidery. Elegant and casual comfort, too. Machine washable, cold water, gentle cycle. Hand to dry. 25″ wide x 29″ long. Was $85. Now $65.

#3, #4 and #5. Three beautiful pillow covers, 100% cotton and hand-woven on the back-strap loom in Chiapas. Reduced from $95 each to $45 each. The brown stripey is beautifully embroidered. The creamy one has traditional design motifs woven into the cloth using the supplementary weft technique.

#6. Embroidered Blouse, 100% cotton, From Tzintzuntzan, the ceremonial center of the pre-Hispanic Purepecha capital along the shores of Lake Patzcuaro, Michoacan. Here, the most astounding embroidery decorates blouses, shirts, and other wearable, telling stories of village life, including weddings and engagements. This blouse is from the most famous embroiderer of them all, Teofila Servin Barriga. Her work commands hundreds, even thousands of dollars! Blouse measures 22-1/2″ wide x 26″ long. $175.

#7. Embroidered Jacket, 100% cotton, from Tzintzuntzan, Michoacan, from Teofila Servin Barriga. Jacket measures 22″ wide x 26″ long and the sleeves are 24-1/2″ long from shoulder seam. Too long? Roll them up! $275.

SOLD. #8. From Venustiano Carranza, Chiapas, a handwoven black blouse with amazing brilliant supplementary weft design woven into the cloth. Wear a Heat-Tech T-shirt underneath for winter warmth and transition into spring and summer with this beautiful, lightweight cotton blouse. Measures 27″ wide x 25″ long. Was $95. Now $55.

SOLD #9. Adorn yourself with a handwoven accent scarf from Venustiano Carranza, Chiapas. A statement in holiday elegance. Was $85. Now $45.

#10. The Francisca Blouse, Purple Haze — all French Knots, intricate and completely made by hand, even the seams and hem! This one is a size LARGE, measuring 17″ wide from shoulder seam to shoulder seam and 28″ long. Sleeves are 3/4 length. Was $145. Now $95.

#11. The Francisca Blouse, Purple Haze — size EXTRA LARGE, measuring 19″ wide from shoulder seam to shoulder seam and 30″ long, with 3/4 length sleeves. Was $145. Now $95.

#12. Tlahuitoltepec black linen shirt jacket with cotton machine stitched embroidery. This embroidery is considered handmade because the seamstress guides the machine free-form! Measures 22″ wide x 26″ long in the front. The back panel of the jacket is 29″ long, designed to cover the tush. Sleeves are 23″ long from the shoulder seam. Was $175. Now $85.

#13. Chakira beaded bodice and fine smocking make this long-sleeved 100% cotton blouse from the mountains of Puebla state a knock-out. Measures 24″ wide x 27″ long. Sleeve length is 18″. Notice the chakira beading at the cuff. Neckline is adjustable with a delicate, handmade drawstring. Embroidered lace accents the bodice and the cuffs. These blouses sold in Santa Fe on the Plaza for $425. Now yours for $165.

Day 2: Mixed (Shopping) Bag: Oaxaca + Chiapas Textiles

As I wrote yesterday for the Day 1: Mixed (Shopping) Bag: Oaxaca + Chiapas Textiles, I purchased a lot of beautiful handwoven, handspun 100% cotton blouses and huipiles when we were on the Oaxaca Coast and Chiapas Highlands. Most are naturally dyed, some with the rare caracol purpura purple snail dye. There are still many extraordinary pieces available from yesterday. Plus, today features more. We hope you will find something that says, Welcome Spring!

Meanwhile, enjoy the spring holidays. Despite all the alarming news about conflict and climate change, there is a lot to be grateful for. Let’s keep Ukraine in our hearts and minds, and make a donation to support all those displaced from this conflict in honor of freedom and democracy in this season of celebration. To life!

For this sale, Oaxaca Cultural Navigator LLC will donate 5% of all sales to HIAS, an international refugee relief program, for support of Ukraine refugees regardless of religious affiliation and in support of Ukraine and refugees from the Americas amassed at the Mexico-USA border waiting for entry.

How to Buy: mailto:norma.schafer@icloud.com Tell us the item you want by number. Send your complete mailing address. Tell us how you want to pay (3 choices, below). We accept three payment methods:

  1. Zelle bank transfer with no service fee.
  2. Venmo with a 3% service fee.
  3. PayPal with a 3% service fee.

When you tell us by email that you are ready to order and have made your selections by Item Number, you will also tell us your payment preference. We will then confirm your order, mark your item sold, send you totals and our Zelle account information. For Venmo or PayPal, we will send you a request for payment that includes a 3% service fee.

Note: We add on $13 for the mailing fee to your total order.

#16. Outstanding huipil from the Amusgo village of Xochistlahuaca, Guerrero, across the Oaxaca border. Natural dyes, backstrap loomed, finest supplementary weft gauze. Flowing, drapey. 30×44” Collector’s piece. $795
SOLD. #17. Embroidered blusa from Aguacatenango, Chiapas made by Francisca. Wear your summer flowers. Size Medium. $75
#18. Night sky blusa made by Grand Master of Mexican Folk Art Lucia Santis Gomez in Magdalena Aldama, Chiapas. Backstrap loomed. three months of work! 23”w x 25” long $450
#19.Blusa dyed with gourd and caracol purpura rare purple snail dye, from Pinotepa de Don Luis, Oaxaca. 29” wide x 30” long. $275

SOLD #21. San Juan Chamula, Chiapas. Agave fiber handwoven market bag with adjustable leather strap. bag is 13×13” and expands to twice the size. $125
SOLD#22. Black on black handwoven, backstrap loomed gauze top from Venustiana Carranza, Chiapas. 23×23” $145
#23. Confetti huipil from Pinotepa de Don Luis, handwoven by Sebastiana from handspun cotton. Subtle stripes and iconic symbols of double-headed eagles accent this piece. Size L-XL. 33”wide x 39” long. $265
#24. Shoulder bag, Xochistlahuaca, Guerrero Amusgo cooperative. Design is supplementary weft wiven into the cloth on the backstrap loom. Bag is 16” wide x 14” l long. strap is 25” long (50” total). $80

SOLD #26. From Pinotepa de Don Luis, handspun cotton dyed with rare caracol purpura purple snail. Use as scarf, wall hangin or table runner, or make into a dress. 23” wide x 68” long. $95

SOLD 27. From Venustiana Carranza, Chiapas, where the climate is tropical! Gauze woven shimmering silver huipil embellished with white, purple, and pink supplementary weft designs of mountains, rain and corn. 24” wide x 32” long. $285
#28. From Famed Alberto Lopez Gomez, Magdalena Aldama, Chiapas. Handwoven, backstrap loomed. 22” wide x 25” long. $450
#29. A rare find from San Juan Cancuc, Chiapas, huipil dyed with nanche bark and cochineal. 21” wide x 36” long. $265
SOLD. #30. San Juan Colorado, Oaxaca, huipil with all natural dyes: coyuchi, iron oxide, mahogany. L-XL. 36” wide x 40” long. $285

#31. Handwoven, backstrap loomed, from Chenalho, Chiapas. 100% cotton, supplementary weft. 23”x 26” $85

2023 Chiapas Textile Study Tour–Deep Into the Maya World

At Oaxaca Cultural Navigator, we aim to give you an unparalleled and in-depth travel experience to participate and delve deeply into indigenous culture, folk art and celebrations. The Maya World of Chiapas, Mexico, spans centuries and borders. Maya people weave their complex universe into beautiful cloth. Symbols are part of an ancient pre-Hispanic animist belief system. In the cloth we see frogs that signal coming rain, the plumed serpent, woman and man and family, earth and sky, the four cardinal points, moon and sun and stars, birds, flowers, symbols of the natural environment. Each weaver chooses her themes based on what is important to her.

We go deep into the Mayan world of southern Mexico, from February 21 to March 1, 2023. While we focus on textiles, we also explore what it means to be indigenous, part of a cooperative, live in a remote village, have agency and access to economic opportunity. We meet creative, innovative and talented people who open their doors and welcome us.

Our dates of February 21 to March 1, 2023, are reserved in a fine historic hotel close to the pedestrian walking streets and the plaza.

8 nights, 9 days in and around the San Cristobal de Las Casas highlands.

Cost • $3,195 double room with private bath (sleeps 2) • $3,895 single room with private bath (sleeps 1)

We are based in the historic Chiapas mountain town of San Cristobal de las Casas, the center of the Maya world in Mexico. Here we will explore the textile traditions of ancient people who weave on back strap looms. Women made cloth on simple looms here long before the Spanish conquest in 1521 and their techniques translate into stunning garments admired and collected throughout the world today. Colorful. Vibrant. Warm. Exotic. Connecting. Words that hardly describe the experience that awaits you.

We are committed to giving you a rich cultural immersion experience that goes deep rather than broad. We cover a lot of territory. That is why we are spending eight nights in this amazing Pueblo Magico — Magic Town — to focus on Maya textiles, weaving and embroidery traditions.

Our cultural journey takes us into villages, homes and workshops to meet the people who keep their traditions vibrant. We explore museums, churches, and ancient cemeteries. This is an interpersonal experience to better know and appreciate Mexico’s amazing artisans.

Your Study Tour Leader is Eric Chavez Santiago. Norma Schafer, Oaxaca Cultural Navigator LLC founder, will also accompany the group.  

Norma Schafer is a retired university administrator and founder of Oaxaca Cultural Navigator LLC. She has lived with the Chavez Santiago family in Teotitlan del Valle since 2005, and also lives in Taos, New Mexico. In 2006, Norma started offering textile weaving and natural dyeing workshops, and cultural and textile study tours, concentrating on Oaxaca and Chiapas. She is a contributor to the textile guidebook, Textile Fiestas of Mexico, has been featured in The New York Times, and has published articles in the international Selvedge Magazine and literary magazines. She writes the blog Oaxaca Cultural Navigator about life and art in Oaxaca and other parts of Mexico.

Eric Chavez Santiago is a weaver and natural dye expert. He is a Oaxaca native, born and raised in Teotitlan del Valle, and speaks Zapotec, Spanish and English.  Eric was the founding director of education at the Museo Textil de Oaxaca from 2008 to 2016. In 2017, Alfredo Harp Helu and Isabel Granen Porrua asked him to open, manage and promote indigenous craft through their folk art gallery Andares del Arte Popular. He resigned in September this year to grow the family enterprise, Taller Teñido a Mano, and to join Norma as a partner in Oaxaca Cultural Navigator. Eric is a graduate of Anahuac University and has made textile presentations throughout the world. He is knowledgeable about Chiapas textiles and techniques.

We also travel with a local historian who was born and raised in Chiapas. She is our compass to discern meaning.

Take this study tour to learn about:

  • culture, history and identity of cloth
  • cultural appropriation or cultural appreciation
  • wool spinning and weaving
  • clothing design and construction
  • embroidery and supplementary (pick-up) weft
  • Maya textile designs — iconography and significance
  • village and individual identity through clothing
  • social justice, opportunities and women’s issues
  • market days and mercantile economy
  • local cuisine, coffee, cacao and chocolate
  • quality and value

We work with one of San Cristobal’s best bilingual cultural guides who has worked with weavers and artisans in the region. Gabriela is a native Chiapaneca who knows the region. You will enjoy learning from her.

We will travel in a comfortable van as we go deep into the Maya world. We promise a sanitized van and all necessary precautions during our visits.

  • We visit 7 Maya weaving villages
  • We enjoy home-cooked meals
  • We meet makers and directly support them
  • We go far and away, off-the-beaten path
  • We decode the weaving designs unique to each woman and village
  • We explore three towns on their market days
  • We understand the sacred, mysterious rituals of Maya beliefs

Villages we visit: Tenejapa, San Lorenzo Zinacantan, San Juan Chamula, San Andres Larrainzar, Magdalena Aldama, Chenalho

Who Should Attend  Anyone who loves cloth, culture, and collaboration • Textile and fashion designers • Weavers, embroiderers and collectors • Photographers and artists who want inspiration • Resellers

Daily Itinerary

Tuesday, February 21: Travel day. Arrive and meet at our hotel in San Cristobal de las Casas. You will receive directions to get from the Tuxtla Gutierrez airport to our hotel. The airport is a clean and modern facility with straightforward signage. You will book your flight to Tuxtla from Mexico City on either Interjet, AeroMar, Volaris or Aeromexico. To find best routes and rates, search Skyscanner.com There are plenty of taxis and shuttle services to take you there. Your cost of transportation to/from San Cristobal is on your own. Taxis are about $55 USD or 800 pesos. Shared shuttle is 180 pesos or about $10 USD.

Wednesday, February 22: On our first day in San Cristobal de las Casas, we orient you to the textiles of the Maya World. You will learn about weaving and embroidery traditions, patterns and symbols, women and villages, history and culture. After a breakfast discussion, we will visit Centro Textiles Mundo Maya museum, Sna Jolobil Museum Shop for fine regional textiles, meander the Santo Domingo outdoor market that takes over the plaza in front of the church, and visit two outstanding textile shops. We guide you along the walking streets to get your bearings. We finish the morning together with a Group Welcome Lunch. (B, L)

Thursday, February 23: Tenejapa is about an hour and a world away from San Cristobal de Las Casas. Today is market day when villagers line the streets filled with fresh fruits, vegetables, meats, and household supplies. Peer into dimly lit doorways to find hidden textile treasures. We’ll meander the market to see what’s there. In years past, I’ve found some stunning shawls, huipils and bags. Keep your eyes open. Then, we will visit an outstanding textile cooperative and then the best pom pom maker in the region. After a box lunch at the centuries- old Romerillo Maya cemetery, we continue on up another mountain to visit Maruch (Maria), a Chamula woman at her rural home. Surrounded by sheep and goats, Maruch will demonstrate back strap loom weaving and wool carding, and how she makes long-haired wool skirts, tunics and shawls. Perhaps there will be some treasures to consider. Return to San Cristobal de Las Casas in time for dinner on your own. (B, L)

Friday, February 24: After breakfast, we set out for Na Bolom, Jaguar House, the home of anthropologist Franz Blom and his photographer wife, Gertrude Duby Blom. The house is now a museum filled with pre-Hispanic folk art and jewelry. We walk the gardens and learn about Franz and Trudy’s work with the Lacandon tribe and their relationship with Frida Kahlo and Diego Rivera. After hot chocolate there we go to the outskirts of town to an outstanding women’s weaving cooperative that was founded over 40 years ago. You will learn about international collaborations and textile design that conserves traditions while meeting marketplace needs for exquisite and utilitarian cloth. After lunch on your own, we meet in the early evening to visit Museo de Trajes Regionales and humanitarian healer Sergio Castro, who has a large private collection of Maya indigenous daily and ceremonial dress representing each Chiapas region. (B)

Saturday, February 25: We set out by foot to a nearby textile studio founded by Alberto Lopez Gomez, a Magdalena Aldama weaver and designer, who was invited to New York Fashion Week in 2020 and Sweden Design Week in 2022 We hear presentations about creativity, style, innovation, and how to incorporate tradition while breaking new ground. Then, we climb on the van for the 45-minute ride to Chenalho where women combine back strap loom weaving and embroidery to make distinctive huipiles. We meet with an artisan cooperative who host us for demonstrations and lunch. (B, L) Evening on your own.

Sunday, February 26: This is a big day! First we go to San Lorenzo Zinacantan, where greenhouses cover the hillsides. Here, indigenous dress is embellished in exquisite floral designs, mimicking the flowers they grow. First we meander the open-air market, then visit the church, bedecked in fresh flowers. Next stop is magical, mystical San Juan Chamula where the once-Catholic church is given over to a pre-Hispanic pagan religious practice that involves chickens, eggs and coca-cola. You’ll find out why. We’ll roam Chamula’s abundant textile market, compare and contrast fabrics and designs. (B, L) Dinner on your own.

Monday, February 27: Today, we make a study tour to the textile villages of San Andres Larrainzer and Magdalena Aldama. This is another ultimate cultural experience to immerse yourself into families of weavers in their humble homes. We will see how they weave and embroider beautiful, fine textiles, ones you cannot find in the city markets or shops. They will host a show and sale for us, and we will join them around the open hearth for a warming meal of free range chicken soup, house made tortillas, and of course, a sip of posh! (B, L)

Tuesday, February 28: This is expoventa day! We have invited one of the finest embroiderers of Aguacatenango blouses, an organic coffee grower/roaster, and a pottery artisan to show and sell their work. Afternoon is on your own to do last minute shopping and packing in preparation for your trip home. We end our study tour with a Regret’s Sale (just in case you have any) and a gala group goodbye dinner. (B, D)

Wednesday, March 1. Depart. You will arrange your own transportation from San Cristobal to the Tuxtla Gutierrez airport. The hotel guest services can help. It takes about 1-1/2 hours to get to Tuxtla, plus 1-2 hours for check-in. Connect from Tuxtla to Mexico City and then on to your home country.

What Is Included

• 8 nights lodging at a top-rated San Cristobal de las Casas hotel within walking distance to the historic center and pedestrian streets

• 8 breakfasts • 4 lunches • 1 grand finale gala dinner

• museum and church entry fees

• luxury van transportation

• outstanding and complete guide services

The workshop does NOT include airfare, taxes, tips, travel insurance, liquor or alcoholic beverages, some meals, and local transportation as specified in the itinerary. We reserve the right to substitute instructors and alter the program as needed.

Cost • $3,195 double room with private bath (sleeps 2) • $3,895 single room with private bath (sleeps 1)

Reservations and Cancellations.  A $500 non-refundable deposit is required to guarantee your spot. The balance is due in two equal payments. The second payment of  50% of the balance is due on or before October 1, 2022. The third 50% payment of the balance is due on or before December 1, 2022. We accept payment using online e-commerce only. We will send you an itemized invoice when you tell us you are ready to register. After December 1, 2022, there are no refunds. If you cancel on or before December 15, 2021, we will refund 50% of your deposit received to date less the $500 non-refundable reservation deposit. After that, there are no refunds.

If we cancel for whatever reason, we will offer a 100% refund of all amounts received to date, less the non-refundable deposit.

All documentation for plane reservations, required travel insurance, and personal health issues must be received 45 days before the program start or we reserve the right to cancel your registration without reimbursement.

NOTE: All travelers must provide proof of vaccination for COVID-19 to travel with us. You must also wear CDC-approved face masks, use hand-sanitizer, and maintain all public health precautions.

How to Register:  First, complete the Registration Form and send it to us. We will then send you an invoice to make your reservation deposit.

To Register, Policies, Procedures & Cancellations–Please Read

Terrain, Walking and Group Courtesy: San Cristobal de las Casas is a hill-town in south central Chiapas, the Mexican state that borders Guatemala. The altitude is 7,000 feet. Streets and sidewalks are cobblestones, mostly narrow and have high curbs. Pavement stones are slippery, especially when walking across driveways that slant at steep angles across the sidewalk to the street. We will do a lot of walking. Being here is a walker’s delight because there are three flat streets devoted exclusively to walking. We walk a lot — up to 10,000 steps per day at a moderate pace. We recommend you bring a walking stick and wear sturdy shoes.

NOTE: If you have mobility issues or health/breathing impediments, please consider that this may not be the program for you.

Traveling with a small group has its advantages and also means that independent travelers will need to make accommodations to group needs and schedule. We include plenty of free time to go off on your own if you wish.

San Juan Colorado, Oaxaca, Where Textiles Tell Stories

San Juan Colorado is up the mountain about an hour-and-half from Pinotepa Nacional along the Costa Chica. It’s at the end of the road, so secluded that the Spanish Conquest and proselytizing priests didn’t reach here until much later. It’s why traditional backstrap loom weaving and natural dyeing have survived over the years.

Mostly women weave here, but some men are also learning. Girls start when they are around ten years old. Native wild preHispanic cotton grows here, too — caramel colored brown, mint green, creamy white make up the palette. White thread can also be dyed red with cochineal, blue with indigo, yellow with wild marigold, brown with nuts and bark. Brazilwood turns white cotton to a fucsia hot pink. Cooking cotton in an iron pot dulls the color. White becomes a soft grey.

We visit one of the oldest cooperatives, Jini Nuu. We gather in the courtyard under the shade of an almond tree The bark is also a dye material. Yuridia and Verónica welcome us. The older women are sitting on the ground, legs tucked under them, bare toes peeking out from their posahuanco wrap-around skirts, spinning cotton with the drop spindle, picking seeds from the cotton to get ready to spin it, and weaving on the backstrap loom.

Our group sits down for lunch. We are served tamales stuff with a local specialty of mangrove mussels and another type stuffed with chicken. There is a spicy beef broth soup, tasty fruit waters, avocado, Oaxaca queso fresco, and plenty of made in the comal tortillas. We are in foodie heaven. Our desert is a shot of Piedra de Alma mezcal.


Mid-afternoon we cross the village to visit Camerina and the Las Sanjuaneras cooperative where they weave beautiful gauze fabric and work only in natural dyes. Their oldest member is age 81 and their youngest is in her 30’s. Cooperatives are important social and economic organizations, offering ways to marketi and also provide mutual support.

Let us know if you want to go in 2023

Designs woven into the cloth are selected by each weaver. They I clise the flora and fauna of the region. Since we are near the coast, this includes crab, turtles, ducks, birds, stars, rainbows, mountains, scorpions, pine trees, corn plants, chickens. The row of women figures holding hands depicts solidarity. Shoulder decorations of zigzag depict the Feathers of Quetzalcoatl — the serpent god. The double-headed eagle has special significance: the duality of life, ting-hangs, man-woman, fertility.