Tag Archives: tapetes

Dos Perros, Durham, NC, Mexican Restaurant Oaxaca Rug Decor

Durham, NC is the destination for dining, named among the top 10 locales in the U.S. for great restaurants and urban redesign.  The downtown is renewed, gentrified and electrified.  It is more than charming.  It is full of spunk and sizzle.  Turn the corner, discover another great dining room and bar with kick-A ambience. One of my favorite Durham eateries is Dos Perros–A Mexican Place. I’ve written about their fresh mango cayenne margaritas and tasty, reasonably priced wine list and knock-your-socks-off pozole with chicken and salsa verde.

 

Federico Chavez Sosa at his loom

 

 

Yesterday, I dropped in for a visit with Charlie (owner) and Raul (manager) who selected four fantastic hand-woven and naturally dyed wool rugs made by our friend Federico Chavez Sosa for permanent display on the walls of the restaurant.  The rugs are beautiful and add a cozy, authentic decor to the brick walls of the renovated historic building that houses the dining spot. Federico is thrilled, too.  There have not been as many visitors to Oaxaca since the fear of drug violence has kept Americans and Canadians from traveling south.   So, we are grateful to Charlie and Raul for wanting to support Federico and his family while adding this special ambience to the Dos Perros restaurant decor.


Teotitlán del Valle; Mexico’s Famous Village of Rug Weavers Read more at Suite101: Teotitlán del Valle: Mexico’s Famous Village of Rug Weavers

Many of you know that Christine Zenino, Chicago-based travel writer and photographer, participated in our recent Oaxaca Day of the Dead Documentary Photography Workshop, October 2010.  Chrissy writes for Suite 101 and just posted this story on November 30, 2010.  It is a lovely reflection of the village and tapestry weaving. I want to share it with you.

http://www.suite101.com/content/teotitln-del-valle-mexicos-famous-village-of-rug-weavers-a312165

Coming up:  June 29-July 5, 2011 — Oaxaca Photography Expedition:  Market Towns and Artisan Villages.  For a complete description, click HERE.

 

Share

Wrapping Up a Week of Oaxaca Rug Exhibitions in North Carolina

Janet says that this has been a terrific week.  “We really liked being in Durham, Chapel Hill and Pittsboro to meet people all over the Triangle.  I noticed that people really like the Mountains and Rains designs because it has a lot of colors, and represents the traditional designs yet also reflects a contemporary look.  They also liked the small special designs that my father Federico wove because they are non-traditional and unusual.”

 

Tapetes Federico Chavez Sosa

 

This rug includes colors made from cochineal, pomegranate, marigold, pecan leaves, moss.

Janet also says that people who know about weaving and appreciate textiles and art are those who understand the labor and time that goes into creating them.  It was wonderful to welcome people to the exhibitions at Dos Perros Restaurant in Durham, at Erica Rothman’s home in Chapel Hill and at the General Store Cafe in Pittsboro.  We had so many people come to the General Store Cafe that we have started saying Pittsboro del Valle, because it is Janet  home away from home in Teotitlan del Valle!

Archeological Museum at Monte Alban Exhibits Teotitlan Textiles

The Teotitlan del Valle community museum held a competition recently and invited talented young weavers who showed promise to submit their work to a jury of village leaders who are master weavers.  Many applied and only a few were selected to exhibit their work at the famed archeological site of Monte Alban where the museum there is featuring them in a special gallery.

Here are a few of my favorites, with the names and addresses where you can contact the artists directly to go and see their work.  Congratulate them, support them, and mention that you heard about them from this blog.

All these pieces were created using the natural color of sheep wool handspun from Chichicapam or handspun wool that is dyed with natural materials: cochineal, indigo, pericone, pecan leaves and shells, moss, pomegrantes, etc.  If you go and visit, encourage their use of natural dyes by purchasing only those rugs where the wool is dyed with “tintas naturales.”  The village leaders are encouraging young people to retain their cultural and weaving heritage, and also to promote the use of natural dyes in the weaving process.  This is important because chemical dyes cause lung health problems that often leads to cancer.

These are some of the young stars…

Antonio Ruiz Gonzalez, Av. Juarez #107, Teotitlan del Valle, rg_antonio@yahoo.com.mx, (951) 16 661 61

Zeferino Clemente Mendoza Bautista, Fiallo #34, Teotitlan del Valle, exlibrisanahuac@hotmail.com, (951) 52 441 41

Taurino Santiago Ruiz, Av. 2 de Abril #23, Teotitlan del Valle, (951) 52 442 32

Manuel Luis Sosa, Av. Hidalgo #80, Teotitlan del Valle, (951) 21 659 10

Shopping Oaxaca: Galeria Lola y Fe

IMG_0563

Around the corner from the Santo Domingo Church on Ave. Cinco de May #408 is the new gallery shop opened by my friends Federico Chavez Sosa and his wife Dolores Santiago Arrellanas.  Her nickname is Lola and his is Fe!  They weave the most spectacular tapetes (rugs) that I have talked about and featured on my blog and website for the past several years.  This is a new adventure for the family.  They have been based in Teotitlan del Valle their entire lives, where they live, work and sell their rugs from their home on Francisco I. Madero #55.  Now, their dream to have a spot in the city that is more accessible to visitors is realized.

They work only in natural dyes, buying the hand carded and spun churro wool from friends in the Oaxaca highland town of Chichicapam.  They wash the wool by hand and prepare it in skein for dyeing.  Then, they create the glorious, vibrant colors using the natural, organic materials from the cochineal bug and plants:  wild marigold, indigo, pecan leaves and shells, pomegranates, lichens and moss.

In addition to the rugs, wall hangings and table coverings, you will find handbags, folk art and other collectibles.

There are many rug vendors in Oaxaca, but few have the artistic mastery of this weaving family.  Designs range from contemporary to traditional, and many rugs incorporate the Zapotec motifs from the archeological sites of Mitla and Monte Alban.  There is depth and imagination that you will find no where else.

It is important to emphasize that chemical dyes used by most other weavers are toxic and put the people who use them at risk for cancer and respiratory illness.  Using natural dyes takes time, skill and greater expense.  Supporting weavers who use authentic natural dyes is a way to sustain the environment, promote good health, and reintroduce indigenous dyeing techniques.

Galeria Lola y Fe has been open less than a week.  It is inside a lovely courtyard with a bubbling fountain, in a space shared by the Gestalt Institute.  To get there, you enter into the courtyard and it is on your immediate left.  The gallery is not visible from the street, so you have to venture inside the courtyard, past the shop that sells fabrics from Mitla.  It is a few doors down from my other favorite gallery, El Nahual.

You can see the documentary I made about this work on YouTube:  Weaving a Curve Movie

To contact Lola y Fe, telephone (951) 524-4078.  Hours vary.

Or (951) 1302481 (son Eric Chavez Santiago, director of education, Museo Textil de Oaxaca)