Tag Archives: Chiapas

Day 3: Mixed (Shopping) Bag: Oaxaca + Chiapas Textiles

There is still a great selection from Day 1: Mixed (Shopping) Bag: Oaxaca + Chiapas Textiles, and Day 2: Mixed (Shopping) Bag: Oaxaca + Chiapas Textiles. Please click on these links to check it out! There are a lot of beautiful handwoven, handspun 100% cotton blouses and huipiles available, many prepared with natural dyes, some with rare caracol purpura purple snail dye.

Today’s post features earrings made with jicara gourd from Pinotepa de Don Luis on the Oaxaca coast, plus bags from Chiapas and Oaxaca, ikat shawls and more. We hope you will find something that says, Welcome Spring!

As we celebrate the spring holidays and give thanks for our freedoms, let’s keep Ukraine in our hearts and minds. For this sale, Oaxaca Cultural Navigator LLC will donate 5% of all sales to HIAS, an international refugee relief program, for support of Ukraine refugees regardless of religious affiliation and in support of Ukraine and refugees from the Americas amassed at the Mexico-USA border waiting for entry.

How to Buy: mailto:norma.schafer@icloud.com Tell us the item you want by number. Send your complete mailing address. Tell us how you want to pay (3 choices, below). We accept three payment methods:

  1. Zelle bank transfer with no service fee.
  2. Venmo with a 3% service fee.
  3. PayPal with a 3% service fee.

When you tell us by email that you are ready to order and have made your selections by Item Number, you will also tell us your payment preference. We will then confirm your order, mark your item sold, send you totals and our Zelle account information. For Venmo or PayPal, we will send you a request for payment that includes a 3% service fee.

Note: We add on $13 for the mailing fee to your total order.

#31. Pillow cover 18”x16” from San Juan Colorado, Oaxaca. $65
SOLD 32 wild marigold dyed ikat shawl wool weft and cotton warp made in Oaxaca. 20” wide x 76” long — great transition to spring and chilly evenings. $85.

SOLD 33. Indigo blue ikat shawl or throw or table cover or beach towel. 100% cotton. Made in Oaxaca. Lots of tone variation from pale to darker. 25”wide x 80” long. $75

SOLD. #34. Khadi Oaxaca hand-spun and woven blouson top, dyed with wild marigold and indigo. size L. 31” wide x 23” long. perfect crop top for jeans! $165
SOLD 35. Wine colored carved jucara gourd earrings, 1-3/4” diameter. Very lightweight + impressive. $25
SOLD #36. Black stars earrings, 1-3/4” diameter, jicara gourd carved. $25
#37. Red flower jicara gourd carved earrings, 1” diameter with 2” dangle. $25
#38. Purple carved jicara gourd earrings, 1-1/4” diameter with 2-3/4” dangle. $25
#39. Cochineal dyed silk cocoon earrings, 1” flowers with 2” dangle. $25
#40. Black circle earrings, carved jicara gourd, 1-3/4” diameter. $25
SOLD 41. Embroidered face mask. cover your KN95 with a flower garden! $12
#42. Teotitlan del Valle wool woven bag, zipper, lined, interior picket, sturdy leather straps. Bag is 11×11” and strap is 27” end-to-end. $55
#43. Finest woven ixtle agave fiber market bag, expa dable with adjustable leather strap, 8” x 9” $65
#44. San Andres Larrainzer, Chiapas small backstrap loom woven sampler, wall-hanging. 4” x 11” $50
#45. Tenejapa, Chiapas woven bag, zipper close. 6-3/4” wide x 5-1/2” high, 37” strap end to end. $32
#46. San Juan Chamula, Chiapas wool bag with embroidered flowers. 9” x 10-1/2” with 47” cord end to end. $32
#47. Oaxaca embroidered cancas tote bag, 14-1/2” x 11” with 30” double strap. $35
#48. Embroidered zipper tote, canvas, lined with interior pocket, 16-1/2” x 12”. $50

Day 2: Mixed (Shopping) Bag: Oaxaca + Chiapas Textiles

As I wrote yesterday for the Day 1: Mixed (Shopping) Bag: Oaxaca + Chiapas Textiles, I purchased a lot of beautiful handwoven, handspun 100% cotton blouses and huipiles when we were on the Oaxaca Coast and Chiapas Highlands. Most are naturally dyed, some with the rare caracol purpura purple snail dye. There are still many extraordinary pieces available from yesterday. Plus, today features more. We hope you will find something that says, Welcome Spring!

Meanwhile, enjoy the spring holidays. Despite all the alarming news about conflict and climate change, there is a lot to be grateful for. Let’s keep Ukraine in our hearts and minds, and make a donation to support all those displaced from this conflict in honor of freedom and democracy in this season of celebration. To life!

For this sale, Oaxaca Cultural Navigator LLC will donate 5% of all sales to HIAS, an international refugee relief program, for support of Ukraine refugees regardless of religious affiliation and in support of Ukraine and refugees from the Americas amassed at the Mexico-USA border waiting for entry.

How to Buy: mailto:norma.schafer@icloud.com Tell us the item you want by number. Send your complete mailing address. Tell us how you want to pay (3 choices, below). We accept three payment methods:

  1. Zelle bank transfer with no service fee.
  2. Venmo with a 3% service fee.
  3. PayPal with a 3% service fee.

When you tell us by email that you are ready to order and have made your selections by Item Number, you will also tell us your payment preference. We will then confirm your order, mark your item sold, send you totals and our Zelle account information. For Venmo or PayPal, we will send you a request for payment that includes a 3% service fee.

Note: We add on $13 for the mailing fee to your total order.

#16. Outstanding huipil from the Amusgo village of Xochistlahuaca, Guerrero, across the Oaxaca border. Natural dyes, backstrap loomed, finest supplementary weft gauze. Flowing, drapey. 30×44” Collector’s piece. $795
SOLD. #17. Embroidered blusa from Aguacatenango, Chiapas made by Francisca. Wear your summer flowers. Size Medium. $75
#18. Night sky blusa made by Grand Master of Mexican Folk Art Lucia Santis Gomez in Magdalena Aldama, Chiapas. Backstrap loomed. three months of work! 23”w x 25” long $450
#19.Blusa dyed with gourd and caracol purpura rare purple snail dye, from Pinotepa de Don Luis, Oaxaca. 29” wide x 30” long. $275

SOLD #21. San Juan Chamula, Chiapas. Agave fiber handwoven market bag with adjustable leather strap. bag is 13×13” and expands to twice the size. $125
SOLD#22. Black on black handwoven, backstrap loomed gauze top from Venustiana Carranza, Chiapas. 23×23” $145
#23. Confetti huipil from Pinotepa de Don Luis, handwoven by Sebastiana from handspun cotton. Subtle stripes and iconic symbols of double-headed eagles accent this piece. Size L-XL. 33”wide x 39” long. $265
#24. Shoulder bag, Xochistlahuaca, Guerrero Amusgo cooperative. Design is supplementary weft wiven into the cloth on the backstrap loom. Bag is 16” wide x 14” l long. strap is 25” long (50” total). $80

SOLD #26. From Pinotepa de Don Luis, handspun cotton dyed with rare caracol purpura purple snail. Use as scarf, wall hangin or table runner, or make into a dress. 23” wide x 68” long. $95

SOLD 27. From Venustiana Carranza, Chiapas, where the climate is tropical! Gauze woven shimmering silver huipil embellished with white, purple, and pink supplementary weft designs of mountains, rain and corn. 24” wide x 32” long. $285
#28. From Famed Alberto Lopez Gomez, Magdalena Aldama, Chiapas. Handwoven, backstrap loomed. 22” wide x 25” long. $450
#29. A rare find from San Juan Cancuc, Chiapas, huipil dyed with nanche bark and cochineal. 21” wide x 36” long. $265
SOLD. #30. San Juan Colorado, Oaxaca, huipil with all natural dyes: coyuchi, iron oxide, mahogany. L-XL. 36” wide x 40” long. $285

#31. Handwoven, backstrap loomed, from Chenalho, Chiapas. 100% cotton, supplementary weft. 23”x 26” $85

Mixed (Shopping) Bag: Oaxaca + Chiapas Textiles

I’m back in Taos, arriving just in time for April winds and lots of blooming plants. Kerchoo. They tell me this is springtime in northern New Mexico and the Rockies. Now I know why my friend Winn, who has lived here for a long time, chooses to stay in Oaxaca until the end of April despite the heat there!

I’m settling in to high desert life here after Jacob and Shelley’s wedding in San Clemente, California on March 26. The new house construction is coming along, albeit more slowly than anticipated because of all the obvious supply chain slowdowns. I’ve finished my taxes (early), and have settled down to sorting through all the wonderful clothes I purchased to support some very talented artisans on the Oaxaca coast and Chiapas highlands. I’m dividing the more than 24 pieces I’m offering for sale into two posts in order not to overwhelm you with choices! Here is the first group. I’ll likely publish the next group either over the weekend or on Monday.

Meanwhile, enjoy the spring holidays. Despite all the alarming international and domestic news, there is a lot to be grateful for. Let’s keep Ukraine in our hearts and minds, and make a donation to support all those displaced from this conflict in honor of freedom and democracy in this season of celebration. To life!

For this sale, Oaxaca Cultural Navigator LLC will donate 5% of all sales to HIAS, an international refugee relief program, for support of Ukraine refugees regardless of religious affiliation and in support of Ukraine and refugees from the Americas amassed at the Mexico-USA border waiting for entry.

How to Buy: mailto:norma.schafer@icloud.com Tell us the item you want by number. Send your complete mailing address. Tell us how you want to pay (3 choices, below). We accept three payment methods:

  1. Zelle bank transfer with no service fee.
  2. Venmo with a 3% service fee.
  3. PayPal with a 3% service fee.

When you tell us by email that you are ready to order and have made your selections by Item Number, you will also tell us your payment preference. We will then confirm your order, mark your item sold, send you totals and our Zelle account information. For Venmo or PayPal, we will send you a request for payment that includes a 3% service fee.

Note: We add on $13 for the mailing fee to your total order.

#2. SOLD Venustiano Carranza, Chiapas gauze huipil, backstrap loom woven w/sparkly yellow, green, red accents in supplementary weft. 23” wide x 33” long. $245
SOLD #3. Native Oaxaca green, coyuchi and cream cotton, handspun, backstrap loomed from Amusgo group in Guerrero. 22” wide x 28” long. $85
#4. From Alberto Lopez Gomez, Kokul Pok cooperative, Magdalena Aldama, Chiapas. He was invited to 2020 NY Fashion Week! Workmanship is outstanding. 22”wide x 24” long. $450
SOLD. #5. Cafe au lait color with coyuchi and green cotton accents, handspun cotton, backstrap loom woven from San Juan Colorado, Oaxaca. 24” wide x 22” long. $165
#6. French knots and organic cotton, Aguacatenango, Chiapas Size L 15” of embrodiery across the bodice. 27” long. $145

#7. same color as above #6, but size XL. $145

#8. Zinacantan Flower Garden. Embroidered on polyester, drip dry. 25” wide x 29” long unfinished hem. $110

#9. Zinacantan Flower Garden 2. Chiapas. 25×29” $110

SOLD #10. San Juan Colorado, Oaxaca, crop top, perfect for jeans, too. Indigo and wild marigold. backstrap loomed. 31” wide x 21” long. $225
#11. Chenalho, Chiapas dog paw design, supplementary weft, blackstrap loomed. 100% cotton. Shawl or table runner! 19” wide x 80” long. $95
SOLD #12. San Juan Colorado, Oaxaca, backstrap loomed. Dyed with raw indigo leaves, supplementary weft woven with coyuchi native cotton. 28” wide x 39” long. $325

#14. Black backstrap loom woven gauze blouse from Venustiano Carranza, accented with supplementary weft colorful pattern. #15 Complimentary scarf included. Blouse is 23” wide x 23” long. Scarf is 15” wide x 72” long. Buy both for $185. Blouse alone is $155. Scarf alone is $75.

Thanks for looking. Remember, please take your measurements to see if a garment will fit. All sales final.

Making progress. Home building on the Rio Grande River Gorge.

San Andres Larrainzar and Magdalena Aldama, Chiapas: Textiles, A Conduit to Culture

Our last road trip on the Chiapas Textile Tour: Deep Into the Maya World takes us to the Maya highlands villages of San Andres Larrainzar and Magdalena Aldama. Many feel that both these villages produce some of the most outstanding textiles of the region. Here, we visit extended family cooperatives where both women and men weave, and a flying shuttle loom workshop that employs over 80 men in a remote village far from the center of town.

Worthy news: We all tested COVID-negative before leaving Chiapas and returning to the USA. This was the fourth tour this season where every participant tested negative.

It is a delight to be here and experience how the textiles are a roadmap to the culture. Weavings incorporate symbols of everyday life and spiritual beliefs. We understand more by seeing, sharing, and learning. We know that for women, the work of weaving is incorporated into other daily activities of cooking, caring for children and elderly family members, attending to the needs of husbands and friends.

Registration Open for 2023 Chiapas Textile Tour: Deep Into the Maya World

How long does it take to weave a huipil? we ask.

Time is a dimension here, not a precise measurement. Life is governed by the rising and setting of the sun, the rotation of the earth, the alignment of moon and stars. The answer to the question is tentative. Oh, maybe eight or nine months, a woman says. Each day is different. She picks up her loom, ties one end to a tree trunk and cinches the waist tie around her mid-section while watching the sheep or goats and children, all is women’s work. Then, she picks it up again while the baby is napping or the husband goes to the field to plant or harvest corn, beans and squash. Work is intermittent and unpredictable.

Chiapas is the poorest state in Mexico. Highlands villages are isolated at the far reaches of winding mountain roads. Poverty keeps people in their place. They live in cinder block houses that have no heat. The floor can be packed earth. A wood-fueled cooking fire gives off a smokey essence that penetrates cotton and wool on the loom The fire is a source of light from which to weave as the sun sets.

Perhaps there is an elementary school there with access to a sixth grade education. Yet from this, the creativity of the human spirit rises and some of the most extraordinary textiles emerge.

My advice is to our travelers is to observe and understand. We do not come here to judge. We can compare values, lifestyle and culture in order to appreciate and explore similarities and differences.

I want to share with you this photo-essay of our last road trip together. I hope you enjoy it.

2023 Chiapas Textile Study Tour–Deep Into the Maya World

At Oaxaca Cultural Navigator, we aim to give you an unparalleled and in-depth travel experience to participate and delve deeply into indigenous culture, folk art and celebrations. The Maya World of Chiapas, Mexico, spans centuries and borders. Maya people weave their complex universe into beautiful cloth. Symbols are part of an ancient pre-Hispanic animist belief system. In the cloth we see frogs that signal coming rain, the plumed serpent, woman and man and family, earth and sky, the four cardinal points, moon and sun and stars, birds, flowers, symbols of the natural environment. Each weaver chooses her themes based on what is important to her.

We go deep into the Mayan world of southern Mexico, from February 21 to March 1, 2023. While we focus on textiles, we also explore what it means to be indigenous, part of a cooperative, live in a remote village, have agency and access to economic opportunity. We meet creative, innovative and talented people who open their doors and welcome us.

Our dates of February 21 to March 1, 2023, are reserved in a fine historic hotel close to the pedestrian walking streets and the plaza.

8 nights, 9 days in and around the San Cristobal de Las Casas highlands.

Cost • $3,195 double room with private bath (sleeps 2) • $3,895 single room with private bath (sleeps 1)

We are based in the historic Chiapas mountain town of San Cristobal de las Casas, the center of the Maya world in Mexico. Here we will explore the textile traditions of ancient people who weave on back strap looms. Women made cloth on simple looms here long before the Spanish conquest in 1521 and their techniques translate into stunning garments admired and collected throughout the world today. Colorful. Vibrant. Warm. Exotic. Connecting. Words that hardly describe the experience that awaits you.

We are committed to giving you a rich cultural immersion experience that goes deep rather than broad. We cover a lot of territory. That is why we are spending eight nights in this amazing Pueblo Magico — Magic Town — to focus on Maya textiles, weaving and embroidery traditions.

Our cultural journey takes us into villages, homes and workshops to meet the people who keep their traditions vibrant. We explore museums, churches, and ancient cemeteries. This is an interpersonal experience to better know and appreciate Mexico’s amazing artisans.

Your Study Tour Leader is Eric Chavez Santiago. Norma Schafer, Oaxaca Cultural Navigator LLC founder, will also accompany the group.  

Norma Schafer is a retired university administrator and founder of Oaxaca Cultural Navigator LLC. She has lived with the Chavez Santiago family in Teotitlan del Valle since 2005, and also lives in Taos, New Mexico. In 2006, Norma started offering textile weaving and natural dyeing workshops, and cultural and textile study tours, concentrating on Oaxaca and Chiapas. She is a contributor to the textile guidebook, Textile Fiestas of Mexico, has been featured in The New York Times, and has published articles in the international Selvedge Magazine and literary magazines. She writes the blog Oaxaca Cultural Navigator about life and art in Oaxaca and other parts of Mexico.

Eric Chavez Santiago is a weaver and natural dye expert. He is a Oaxaca native, born and raised in Teotitlan del Valle, and speaks Zapotec, Spanish and English.  Eric was the founding director of education at the Museo Textil de Oaxaca from 2008 to 2016. In 2017, Alfredo Harp Helu and Isabel Granen Porrua asked him to open, manage and promote indigenous craft through their folk art gallery Andares del Arte Popular. He resigned in September this year to grow the family enterprise, Taller Teñido a Mano, and to join Norma as a partner in Oaxaca Cultural Navigator. Eric is a graduate of Anahuac University and has made textile presentations throughout the world. He is knowledgeable about Chiapas textiles and techniques.

We also travel with a local historian who was born and raised in Chiapas. She is our compass to discern meaning.

Take this study tour to learn about:

  • culture, history and identity of cloth
  • cultural appropriation or cultural appreciation
  • wool spinning and weaving
  • clothing design and construction
  • embroidery and supplementary (pick-up) weft
  • Maya textile designs — iconography and significance
  • village and individual identity through clothing
  • social justice, opportunities and women’s issues
  • market days and mercantile economy
  • local cuisine, coffee, cacao and chocolate
  • quality and value

We work with one of San Cristobal’s best bilingual cultural guides who has worked with weavers and artisans in the region. Gabriela is a native Chiapaneca who knows the region. You will enjoy learning from her.

We will travel in a comfortable van as we go deep into the Maya world. We promise a sanitized van and all necessary precautions during our visits.

  • We visit 7 Maya weaving villages
  • We enjoy home-cooked meals
  • We meet makers and directly support them
  • We go far and away, off-the-beaten path
  • We decode the weaving designs unique to each woman and village
  • We explore three towns on their market days
  • We understand the sacred, mysterious rituals of Maya beliefs

Villages we visit: Tenejapa, San Lorenzo Zinacantan, San Juan Chamula, San Andres Larrainzar, Magdalena Aldama, Chenalho

Who Should Attend  Anyone who loves cloth, culture, and collaboration • Textile and fashion designers • Weavers, embroiderers and collectors • Photographers and artists who want inspiration • Resellers

Daily Itinerary

Tuesday, February 21: Travel day. Arrive and meet at our hotel in San Cristobal de las Casas. You will receive directions to get from the Tuxtla Gutierrez airport to our hotel. The airport is a clean and modern facility with straightforward signage. You will book your flight to Tuxtla from Mexico City on either Interjet, AeroMar, Volaris or Aeromexico. To find best routes and rates, search Skyscanner.com There are plenty of taxis and shuttle services to take you there. Your cost of transportation to/from San Cristobal is on your own. Taxis are about $55 USD or 800 pesos. Shared shuttle is 180 pesos or about $10 USD.

Wednesday, February 22: On our first day in San Cristobal de las Casas, we orient you to the textiles of the Maya World. You will learn about weaving and embroidery traditions, patterns and symbols, women and villages, history and culture. After a breakfast discussion, we will visit Centro Textiles Mundo Maya museum, Sna Jolobil Museum Shop for fine regional textiles, meander the Santo Domingo outdoor market that takes over the plaza in front of the church, and visit two outstanding textile shops. We guide you along the walking streets to get your bearings. We finish the morning together with a Group Welcome Lunch. (B, L)

Thursday, February 23: Tenejapa is about an hour and a world away from San Cristobal de Las Casas. Today is market day when villagers line the streets filled with fresh fruits, vegetables, meats, and household supplies. Peer into dimly lit doorways to find hidden textile treasures. We’ll meander the market to see what’s there. In years past, I’ve found some stunning shawls, huipils and bags. Keep your eyes open. Then, we will visit an outstanding textile cooperative and then the best pom pom maker in the region. After a box lunch at the centuries- old Romerillo Maya cemetery, we continue on up another mountain to visit Maruch (Maria), a Chamula woman at her rural home. Surrounded by sheep and goats, Maruch will demonstrate back strap loom weaving and wool carding, and how she makes long-haired wool skirts, tunics and shawls. Perhaps there will be some treasures to consider. Return to San Cristobal de Las Casas in time for dinner on your own. (B, L)

Friday, February 24: After breakfast, we set out for Na Bolom, Jaguar House, the home of anthropologist Franz Blom and his photographer wife, Gertrude Duby Blom. The house is now a museum filled with pre-Hispanic folk art and jewelry. We walk the gardens and learn about Franz and Trudy’s work with the Lacandon tribe and their relationship with Frida Kahlo and Diego Rivera. After hot chocolate there we go to the outskirts of town to an outstanding women’s weaving cooperative that was founded over 40 years ago. You will learn about international collaborations and textile design that conserves traditions while meeting marketplace needs for exquisite and utilitarian cloth. After lunch on your own, we meet in the early evening to visit Museo de Trajes Regionales and humanitarian healer Sergio Castro, who has a large private collection of Maya indigenous daily and ceremonial dress representing each Chiapas region. (B)

Saturday, February 25: We set out by foot to a nearby textile studio founded by Alberto Lopez Gomez, a Magdalena Aldama weaver and designer, who was invited to New York Fashion Week in 2020 and Sweden Design Week in 2022 We hear presentations about creativity, style, innovation, and how to incorporate tradition while breaking new ground. Then, we climb on the van for the 45-minute ride to Chenalho where women combine back strap loom weaving and embroidery to make distinctive huipiles. We meet with an artisan cooperative who host us for demonstrations and lunch. (B, L) Evening on your own.

Sunday, February 26: This is a big day! First we go to San Lorenzo Zinacantan, where greenhouses cover the hillsides. Here, indigenous dress is embellished in exquisite floral designs, mimicking the flowers they grow. First we meander the open-air market, then visit the church, bedecked in fresh flowers. Next stop is magical, mystical San Juan Chamula where the once-Catholic church is given over to a pre-Hispanic pagan religious practice that involves chickens, eggs and coca-cola. You’ll find out why. We’ll roam Chamula’s abundant textile market, compare and contrast fabrics and designs. (B, L) Dinner on your own.

Monday, February 27: Today, we make a study tour to the textile villages of San Andres Larrainzer and Magdalena Aldama. This is another ultimate cultural experience to immerse yourself into families of weavers in their humble homes. We will see how they weave and embroider beautiful, fine textiles, ones you cannot find in the city markets or shops. They will host a show and sale for us, and we will join them around the open hearth for a warming meal of free range chicken soup, house made tortillas, and of course, a sip of posh! (B, L)

Tuesday, February 28: This is expoventa day! We have invited one of the finest embroiderers of Aguacatenango blouses, an organic coffee grower/roaster, and a pottery artisan to show and sell their work. Afternoon is on your own to do last minute shopping and packing in preparation for your trip home. We end our study tour with a Regret’s Sale (just in case you have any) and a gala group goodbye dinner. (B, D)

Wednesday, March 1. Depart. You will arrange your own transportation from San Cristobal to the Tuxtla Gutierrez airport. The hotel guest services can help. It takes about 1-1/2 hours to get to Tuxtla, plus 1-2 hours for check-in. Connect from Tuxtla to Mexico City and then on to your home country.

What Is Included

• 8 nights lodging at a top-rated San Cristobal de las Casas hotel within walking distance to the historic center and pedestrian streets

• 8 breakfasts • 4 lunches • 1 grand finale gala dinner

• museum and church entry fees

• luxury van transportation

• outstanding and complete guide services

The workshop does NOT include airfare, taxes, tips, travel insurance, liquor or alcoholic beverages, some meals, and local transportation as specified in the itinerary. We reserve the right to substitute instructors and alter the program as needed.

Cost • $3,195 double room with private bath (sleeps 2) • $3,895 single room with private bath (sleeps 1)

Reservations and Cancellations.  A $500 non-refundable deposit is required to guarantee your spot. The balance is due in two equal payments. The second payment of  50% of the balance is due on or before October 1, 2022. The third 50% payment of the balance is due on or before December 1, 2022. We accept payment using online e-commerce only. We will send you an itemized invoice when you tell us you are ready to register. After December 1, 2022, there are no refunds. If you cancel on or before December 15, 2021, we will refund 50% of your deposit received to date less the $500 non-refundable reservation deposit. After that, there are no refunds.

If we cancel for whatever reason, we will offer a 100% refund of all amounts received to date, less the non-refundable deposit.

All documentation for plane reservations, required travel insurance, and personal health issues must be received 45 days before the program start or we reserve the right to cancel your registration without reimbursement.

NOTE: All travelers must provide proof of vaccination for COVID-19 to travel with us. You must also wear CDC-approved face masks, use hand-sanitizer, and maintain all public health precautions.

How to Register:  First, complete the Registration Form and send it to us. We will then send you an invoice to make your reservation deposit.

To Register, Policies, Procedures & Cancellations–Please Read

Terrain, Walking and Group Courtesy: San Cristobal de las Casas is a hill-town in south central Chiapas, the Mexican state that borders Guatemala. The altitude is 7,000 feet. Streets and sidewalks are cobblestones, mostly narrow and have high curbs. Pavement stones are slippery, especially when walking across driveways that slant at steep angles across the sidewalk to the street. We will do a lot of walking. Being here is a walker’s delight because there are three flat streets devoted exclusively to walking. We walk a lot — up to 10,000 steps per day at a moderate pace. We recommend you bring a walking stick and wear sturdy shoes.

NOTE: If you have mobility issues or health/breathing impediments, please consider that this may not be the program for you.

Traveling with a small group has its advantages and also means that independent travelers will need to make accommodations to group needs and schedule. We include plenty of free time to go off on your own if you wish.