Tribute to Mothers: Feliz Dia de la Madre

Red roses for love, a Mother’s Day Gift to you

First, a bouquet of red roses for all mothers, daughters and foster mothers. For the women in our lives who give us strength, courage and determination to stand up with shoulders back, head high. For the women who came before us to open the path and show us the way. Saludos y felicidades, siempre.

Mother’s Day, dedicated to my own mother, Dorothy Schafitz Beerstein, b. February 14, 1916, d. November 15, 2015, and the remarkable women of Mexico.

Embroidered story rebozo by Teofila Servin Barriga, Patzcuaro, Michoacan

Rosa, center, and her nieces, Magdalenas Aldama

In Yochib, Oxchuc,talented weaver with impaired mobility, limited health care access

The girls who will become women, learning from the matriarch

The young women, keepers of tradition and culture

To those of us who explore and discover and support the makers

Cousins Maya and Alicia in Teotitlan del Valle, Oaxaca

The generations: Grandma Juana, Baby Luz, and Mama Edith

Grower of native corn, Mixe region of Oaxaca

My own mother, two years before her death at age 99 

For everything hand-made, here’s to the makers!

The women pottery makers of San Marcos Tlapazola

Intricately embroidered blouse, San Bartolome Ayautla, 8 months to make

To Lila Downs, who tells stories in song, with compassion

Frida Kahlo Calderon, our muse and heroine

Susie in Chiapas, thanks to the adventurers who visit

To the women who love and give care

Deceased potter Dolores Porras, inspiration for Atzompa

To Margarita, the basket weaver, Benito Juarez Market

Thank you to all the women who make a difference just by being you!

Just In Time for Mother’s Day: Turquoise and Coral Jewelry

I’m in SoCal at the moment and returning to North Carolina tomorrow morning. My sister and I went to a fundraising event on Saturday night and bought these two beautiful pieces of jewelry in a moment of wanting to support the organization. We both realized there is no morning after pill to remedy a purchase we did not need! So, I am offering these two pieces for sale.

The prices are what we paid for them. We will accept any reasonable offer and get them to you in time for Mother’s Day at a fixed mailing cost of $10 added to the purchase price.

Tell me which one you want by email.    Tell me your price and your mailing address. I will send you a PayPal invoice. I’ll ship two-day priority USPS.

List price: $75 USD. Tibetan Inlaid Turquoise & Coral Earrings, 3-1/2″ long

List Price: $295. Graduated Natural Turquoise collar with silver agate accent bead, 17″ long including clasp.

Is Cinco de Mayo Mexican Independence Day? NO!

Why is Cinco de Mayo celebrated and where is it celebrated most? More than a great time for a Margarita or a swig of Corona, Cinco de Mayo was the response by Mexican-Americans — mostly Californians — to the French invasion of Mexico, The Battle of Puebla, and fear that the North would lose the Civil War, enslaving those with Mexican heritage along with Blacks throughout the southwest.

Mexican Californians gave hugs amounts of financial support to preserve the Union and defeat the Confederacy. They had a lot at stake.

I wrote about the roots of Cinco de Mayo in 2012 that offers history and a UCLA professor’s research about the topic.

I’m in southern California this weekend for a family reunion and to attend a Cinco de Mayo Fiesta Viva la Vida honoring a dear friend, Michael Stone and his wife Charlotte.  I’m reminded again being in my California homeland about how strong Mexican culture here is and has been for centuries. Afterall, this was once part of New Spain!

Mexican Flag, La Bandera de Mexico, Zocalo, Mexico City

So, raise one today for the courage of Mexican-Americans who helped defeat France in the Battle of Puebla, and thereby averting French support for the Confederate Army. We owe them a lot.

Viva la Vida.  Viva Mexico!

Meanwhile, I’ll be back in Oaxaca on June 28. Publishing intermittently until then!  Saludos.

Heirloom Beans: Mexico’s Legumes Elevated to a Higher Power

The Hunt for Mexico’s Heirloom Beans, a New Yorker Magazine feature written by Burkhard Bilger and published 4/23/2018, starts and ends with eating.  Thanks to my Teotitlan del Valle friend Scott Roth for sending me this article, lengthy but worth the time to read.

For northern North Americans unfamiliar with bean culture, we think of this legume as filler, to be mashed, seasoned, dipped into with a tortilla chip, pushed aside or preceded with a Bean-O pill to cut intestinal gas.

Eat your lima beans, I remember my mother saying. Ugh. It wasn’t until much later, when I learned to cook fresh limas, that I began to appreciate the oft-maligned bean.

For Mexicans, where the bean originates, it is a staple of life, high in protein and flavorful in its pure and simple state of existence. Cook it simply in water and salt, says Rancho Gordo heirloom bean maven Steve Sando, and you will love the taste and texture.

Rafael Mier holds Jaguar Beans, a rare, ancient strain

Here in the south of the United States of America where I have lived for the past thirty years, the traditionalists gravitate toward black-eyed peas and collards. This is especially true during New Years, when the black-eyed pea is center stage on every table to signify a new year of abundance. I’ve even seen the tradition carried to snow-bound climes by southerners yearning for a bit of home. 

Out west where I grew up, my family’s preferred bean was pinto, always industrially grown and originating from a sixteen-ounce tin that my mother could easily open with her electric can opener.  With contents dumped into the Farberware two-quart saucepan, gas burner turned to high, the beans were ready to serve in minutes to accompany the chewy, gray-center ground sirloin she called hamburger, if they didn’t burn first.

Weighing native beans, Teotitlan del Valle Market

I used to think that black beans were a gourmet delight when I started living in Oaxaca in 2006. I used to think that big, plump beans were better than dwarf-like varieties. Little did I pay attention to the fact that the bigger the bean, the more likely they are to be genetically modified. I didn’t realize that there are almost as many varieties of beans in Mexico as there is corn, based on regional differences and genetic adaptation to soil and climate.

In December 2017, I wrote a blog post, Union Zapata Hosts Biodiversity Fair in Oaxaca. Native corn, squash and beans took center stage. I went there in search of red, purple, yellow, and blue corn. I left with a deeper appreciation for what it takes to sustain a traditional milpa — the bean, corn, squash native agricultural growing exchange that provides complex protein intake for indigenous people.

Here is my challenge: Think about your own experience about beans growing up. Add your memories in the comment section. Share your recipes. Treat yourself to some real beans!

Mexican yellow bean soup, Norma’s made-up recipe

Scott Roth with old Zapotec rug

 

Women’s Writing Retreat in Oaxaca, Mexico: Take a Discount and Express Yourself

This is our 8th year to offer the Oaxaca Women’s Creative Writing and Gentle Yoga Retreat from June 22-29, 2018. We want a full-house and are offering a 10% discount off the already high-value, low price of $895 for a shared room and $1195 for a single room. It’s not too late to get on board and join us.

Who is this for? Beginning and experienced writers, those who believe they can do it and need inspiration and coaching, note-jotters and margin-scribblers. Do you have an idea for a novel, a memoir, a prose poem, a travel piece or family history? This is the place for you.

See the complete course description HERE.

Send me an email with your interest HERE.

Please share with family and friends who would like this retreat.